Category Archives: CTO/CIO

25 Rumsfelds Rules for Startups

RumsfeldsRules

Join 12,100 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

While we are still deep in the woods of a government shutdown, I thought it would be interesting to sum up some of our former Defense Secretary’s words of wisdom.

Rumsfeld may not have done everything right, but some of his quotes are priceless. What’s more they appeal to Startups quite nicely…

1 If you are working from your inbox, you are working on other people’s priorities.

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2 Men count up the faults of those who keep them waiting.

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3 In unanimity, there may well be either cowardice or uncritical thinking.

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4 Test ideas in the marketplace. You learn from hearing a range of perspectives.

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5. You can’t recover a fumble unless you’re on the field. Get out there.

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Read this: Why the Twitter IPO mentioned scalability

6. First law of holes. If you get in one, stop digging.

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7. Talent hits a target no one else can hit. Genius hits a target no one else can see.

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8. You pay the same price for doing something halfway as for doing it completely so you might as well do it completely.

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9. It is difficulties that show what men are.

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10. What you measure, improves.

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Also: Why I don’t work with recruiters

11. If you are lost, “climb, conserve and confess”

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12. It is not the strongest species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

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13. Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

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14. People don’t spend money earned by others with the same care that they spend their own.

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15. Disagreement is not disloyalty.

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Related: Why a CTO must never do this

16. A lie travels halfway around the world before the truth gets its shoes on.

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17. It is easier to convince someone they’re right, than to convince them they’re wrong.

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18. Your best question is often why.

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19. Simply because a problem is shown to exist, it doesn’t necessarily follow that there is a solution.

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20. The world is run by those who show up.

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Read: Who is Sean Hull?

21. Don’t panic. Things may be going better than they seem from the inside.

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22. Know that the amount of criticism you receive may correlate closely to the amount of publicity you get.

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23. Sunshine is a weather report, a flood is news.

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24. If you expect people to be in on the landing, include them in the takeoff.

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25. If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it.

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Read this: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

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5 conversational ways to evaluate great consultants

Startups and more mature businesses alike, and those large and small, at some point will need to hire a consultant or two. Want to get the best bang for your buck? Ask some tough questions!

Join 8000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. Make sure they’re not going to quit

I’ve heard so many crash and burn stories over the years, it makes my head spin.

One client had hired a consultant who was supposed to be the best in NYC. After only a few weeks of working with the client, he explained that they were “doing it all wrong”. Furthermore he had a travel schedule to meet, with speaking engagements in South America.

So he basically dropped them! As the client retold this story to me, I wonder if they could hear my head shaking, I was stunned. Who would turn away from a customer in pain? And furthermore turn away from one who could clearly use the expertise of someone who had seen a lot before!?

Keep in mind the reasons why people leave consulting.

2. Be sure they have some war stories to tell

Any consultant who’s been in business for a while, surely has some good war stories to tell. Talk about those, and find out the battles they’ve been in.

I can tell a few myself. In one case I was only 12 hours from leaving for summer vacation when a long time colleague and former client called me. They were in a serious emergency. The big boys, the remote DBAs that many in the industry use, had broken their database. Replication was misconfigured, and they were running blind. I ended up on a SKYPE call fixing the database and troubleshooting problems on Virgin’s inflight wifi. You don’t forget that kind of firefighting.

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Be sure they won’t quit, ask about war stories, test for some push back and be sure they empathize with your business pain. But more importantly ask them to tell their own business story. You’ll learn a lot.
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For another client, back in the dot-com days, their application was stalling completely. Customers were leaving, and so was an 80 million dollar buyout deal. Nothing a few Oracle parameters couldn’t fix!.

And there are always a few tales of woe between sales teams, and the engineers that then must deploy solutions in the real world. Beware the sales wolf in sheeps clothing and do your homework aka due diligence on technical solutions.

3. Ensure they can provide resistance & push back

Good consultants have to walk a tightrope all the time. On the one hand they are tasked with making their clients happy. At the end of the day, improving their position, business bottom line, yes these are crucial. Sure that means saying yes, that means trying to be a problem solver as much as possible.

But always saying yes, avoids hard truths that you have to share. I had one client whose primary Oracle dba went on vacation. Before he left we reviewed systems. Multi-master replication in Oracle is brittle by nature. We both agreed. And I agreed not to change the configurations lest it break other things down the line. Not one week into his vacation a mandate comes back from on high, this change absolutely has to happen now. There are millions of dollars at stake!

Applying strong resistance is necessary to avoid breaking something even bigger. And it was not easy to stand strong in the face of such pressure. But I assured the team that such changes would mean even bigger problems for the company.

4. Find out if they empathize with your pain

In one of the biggest ironic twists, consultants should understand the pain of building a business. Because they themselves have experienced when clients don’t pay so they understand cash flow problems themselves. That is what every small business struggles with, and most startups too!

5. Ask them how they built their business

For me, one of the least appreciated things about independent consulting is, that in the most important ways, it is about running a small business. So someone who has built and kept running a freelance or consulting business knows how to make hard decisions, and keep their eyes on the ball.

A consultant needs to know how to get business first and foremost. But then how to manage engagements carefully. Once you’ve got those two down, keep building your business incrementally.

Someone who has successfully run a real business for years can share the story of what they’ve done. What has worked, what hasn’t worked, how they have pivoted when necessary, how they have failed fast, and moved through it.

They can tell you how they stay cash flow positive, can deliver on time, can be likeable and communicate with teams, and really understand every side of a business.

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NYC Tech Firms Are Hiring – Map

Made In NY - Startups Hiring

If you haven’t noticed how much the NYC tech scene has grown recently, I’m afraid you’ve been hiding under a rock. It’s simply incredible.

Take a look at Mapped In NY a google maps mashup of the growing list popularized by the NY Tech Meetup called Made In New York.

Join 5000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

[mytweetlinks]

Having been around during the first dot-com boom back in the late 1990′s this is even more exciting to see. Despite the recession, New York’s economy is truly thriving!

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New York’s Startup scene is truly thriving with a whopping 1263 firms, many of which are hiring.
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Why is database administration talent in short supply? They are the Mythical MySQL DBAs

Also take a look at: Why Generalists are Better at Scaling the Web

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Don't Miss Percona Live 2013

The biggest event on the MySQL calendar is the yearly Percona Live and it’s just around the corner.

This year you’ll be able to pick from a whopping 110 technical sessions by 90 different speakers from companies like Facebook, Amazon, Google and Linkedin. Learn what’s happening at the cutting edge of open source database deployments. Besides the technical sessions, there’s plenty of hobnobbing with fellow DBAs, developers, and industry folks. A great opportunity all around.

It’s just a couple of weeks away, so don’t waste any time. You can register here and enjoy a 20% discount code “SH-Live”!

Get to it!

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When You Have to Take the Fall

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

One of the biggest jobs in operations is monitoring. There are so many servers, databases, webservers, search servers, backup servers. Each has lots of moving parts, lots that can go wrong. Typically if you have monitoring, and react to that monitoring, you’ll head off bigger problems later.

A problem is brewing

We, myself & the operations team started receiving alerts for one server. Space was filling up. Anyone can relate to this problem. You fill up your dropbox, or the drive on your laptop and all sorts of problems will quickly bubble to the surface.

Also check out – Why generalists are better at scaling the web.

As we investigated over the coming days, a complicated chain of processes and backups were using space on this server. Space that didn’t belong to them.

Dinner boils over

What happened next was inevitable. The weekly batch jobs kicked off and failed for lack of space. Those processes were not being monitored. Business units then discovered missing data in their reports and a firestorm of emails ensued.

Hiring? Get our MySQL DBA Interview Guide for managers, recruiters and candidates alike.

Why weren’t these services being monitored, they wanted to know.

Time to shoot the messenger

Having recently seen a changing of the guard, and a couple of key positions left vacant, it was clear that the root problem was communication.

Looking for talent? Why is it so hard to find a mythical MySQL DBA or devops expert these days?

I followed up the group emails, explaining in polite tone that we do in fact have monitoring in place, but that it seemed a clear chain of command was missing, and this process fell through the cracks.

I quickly received a response from the CTO requesting that I not send “these types of emails” to the team and to direct issues directly to him.

You might also like: A CTO Must Never Do This

A consultants job

As the sands continued to shift, a lead architect did emerge, one who took ownership of the products overall. Acting as a sort of life guard with a higher perch from which to watch, we were able to escalate important issues & he would then prioritize the team accordingly.

Are you a startup grappling with scalability? Keep in mind these 5 things toxic to scalability

Sometimes things have to break a little first.

What’s more a consultants job isn’t necessarily to lead the pack, nor to force management to act. A consultant’s job is to provide the best advice possible & to raise issues to the decision makers. And yes sometimes it means being a bit of a fall guy.

Those are the breaks of the game.

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When Clients Don't Pay – Consulting War Stories

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

It’s a cold cold winter out there, so as they say you need money to keep the lights on? Yep, that’s true whether you’re a small business or a consultant. Everyone has to pay their bills. Or do they?

It’s an unfortunate fact of life in business, but sometimes there are differences. Disagreements about deliverables, timelines, milestones, and deadlines. But when all the work is done, there are still sometimes differences over dollars.

Over the years most of those I’ve managed to work out with clients, but there were a few that went sour. One case was with a large entertainment firm. The music business is one that I hadn’t interacted with much before. For these guys I’d done a few days work in the past, and was paid promptly. Now they were in a bit of a jam. They called me up and asked if I could help.

Related article: A CTO Must Never Do This.

These types of emergencies often come at the worst times, and I explained that I was already juggling a few other things. They pleaded for help, and I relented. I carved out a full day of time for them, explaining the day rate and so forth. While on the phone though, I expressed caution.

[quote]I understand that your issue is urgent now, what happens if your needs change in the next 48 hours, I asked? Not a problem they replied, we can use your help anyway, so we’ll book you either way. Fast forward 48 hours, work canceled & client won’t take my call.[/quote]

Great I thought, verbal assurances. That works for me, I thought.

Fast forward 32 hours, and I receive an email saying the problem is resolved, and offering a “kill fee” of which I knew nothing, and which was never negotiated or discussed.

Along comes the day of reconning, and I call the client. They don’t take my call. Shortly there after I receive additional emails. I reply and explain we should talk on the phone. Still the client can’t find the time to pickup the call.

So I judiciously put together an invoice for the work. I email it directly to finance, and CC all parties. From there I get responses ranging from disinterest to denial. Over the coming months I periodically resend the invoice, but to no avail.

Or was it? I actually feel that this experience is to great avail.

1. Small disagreements foreshadow larger ones down the road
2. A relationship between client and vendor is a mutual one. If parties can only pickup the phone when they need something, then things are out of balance already.

Sure I lost a day & the fee associated. But I gained a lesson.

Patience and polite persistence

I firmly believe that being patient and persistent wins in the end. Sometimes clients have hiccups in payroll or budgets. Keep communication lines open.

Freelancers & consultants: Grab my Consulting 101 Guide.

Appealing to fairness

If you maintain a healthy relationship with your client, then appeals to fairness are normally heeded.

Appealing to promises

Emails are important to keep a paper trail of agreements. Communicate clearly and often so you know when you get derailed, and can refer back to what was agreed previously.

Popular: AirBNB didn’t have to failed – AWS hosting outages.

Setting precedents & expectations up front

This is an important one, that freelancers and consultants alike sometimes forget. Setting and agreeing on expectations is key. Often details are in the fine print or left out completely. So ongoing communication can iron out those differences or bring them to light.

Want to hire the best? Read our DBA Interview Guide.

Getting a protective deposit

If you haven’t worked together before, a deposit makes a lot of sense. Executing on this is more than a show of faith. It underlines that accounts payable is on board with your hiring, and you are now in the payments system.

Related: Hiring is a numbers game

Sizing each other up

Websites provide the first representation of you and your client to each other. How you carry yourself and how they feel meeting them face to face is important as well. Ideally you’ll meet each other at the client’s offices, where you may meet others on the team, and put names to faces. At the very least a skype call will go a long way as well.

Managing spend – communication along the way

Keep a close eye on invoices. If a client is getting behind, resolve it before continuing to work. Deadlines are mutual in a business relationship. Yours to complete work by a certain date, and theirs to pay by an equally agreed upon time.

Read also: Real Disaster Recovery Lessons from hurricane Sandy.

Never go to court – defer to the handshake & gentleman’s agreement

I know the lawyers out there may think I’m naive. But I’ve been in business a long time, and I believe a handshake means and says a lot. Also common sense language & contracts, in the form of emails and so forth are better than heavily legalese ones that no one but a lawyer can understand.

What’s more going to court has a huge cost in time & stress. Don’t go that route. I also think it appeals to clients knowing that you’re not the litigious sort.

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A master isn't born but made

A review of Mastery by Robert Greene.

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

Robert Greene’s 48 Laws of Power was a great read, offering endless lessons for business and personal dealings. When I saw he just published a new book, I was quick to grab a copy.

What I like about his writing is that he’s replete with counterintuitive bits of wisdom, that really offer new perspectives on old topics.

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Many people might find the notion of an apprenticeship and skill acquisition as quaint relics of bygone eras when work meant making things. After all, we have entered the information and computer age, in which technology makes it so we can di without the kinds of menial tasks that require practice and repetition; so many things have become virtual in our lives making the craftsman model obsolete. Or so the argument goes.
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You might also enjoy our 3 part consulting 101 guide and our very popular DBA hiring guide.

He goes on to elaborate on this idea…

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In truth, however, this idea of the nature of the times we are living in is completely incorrect, even dangerous. The era we have entered is not one in which technology will make everything easier, but rather a time of increased complexity that affects every field. In business, competition has become globalized and more intense. A business person must have a command of a much larger picture than in the past, which means more knowledge and skills. The future in science does not lie in specialization but rather in combining and cross-fertilization of knowledge in various fields. In the arts, tastes and styles are changing at an accelerated rate. An artist must be on top of this and capable of creating new forms, always remaining ahead of the curve. This often requires having more than just a specialized knowledge of that particular art form — it requires knowing other arts, even the sciences, and what is happening in the world.
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I couldn’t agree more. We wrote a piece a while back called Why generalists are better at scaling the web and that aligns nicely with what Greene is getting at here.

He begins with insight on finding ones life task, then apprenticeship & mentoring then working through the social challenges that are always present and finally ways to stimulate the creative-active impulses.

I really like that he emphasizes it as a process and one of life-long hard work. This resonates a lot for me, as that’s how I’ve found success doing independent consulting over the years. There have been a lot of ups and downs, wrong turns, and missteps, but tenacity wins out in the end. He even dispells the myth of the naturally gifted, such as Mozart or Einstein, arguing that in fact they did put in the requisite 10,000 hours of study and were not born with mastery as such.

Greene’s lastest book is a pleasure to read, and full of insight for startups, programmers, designers and business people alike. I highly recommend it.

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Business Agility at AWS re:Invent

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

Although I couldn’t be in Vegas to attend re:Invent, there is so much online it’s almost better than being at the conference. From an ongoing live stream of keynotes and sessions, to an archived collection on Youtube.

The big wins

You may have heard of all the great things that Amazon or cloud computing can do, but I thought Andy Jassy summarized these nicely in these six points.

1. Replace capex with opex
2. lower total costs of ownership
3. no guessing about capacity
4. encourage agility & innovation
5. differentiation
6. global from the start

Redshift

By far the biggest announcement at the show is Amazon’s new Redshift product. It is a fully managed datawarehouse solution that scales to petabytes in it’s cloud. Currently there are two business intelligence tools that are supported namely Jaspersoft and Microstrategy.

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In 2003 Amazon was a 5 billion dollar company. Today AWS adds the same infrastructure capacity everyday to it’s availability zones!
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Reduced prices by 25% for S3

As a lot of folks know, Amazon has always been about cheaper prices. That model has been disruptive in the book selling industry, and in a huge way in the infrastructure and datacenter industry. As more customers signup, economies of scale mean they can offer the same hardware & services for lower prices.

With that they’re announcing lower prices for S3 by a whopping 25%. To me this speaks to their continuing push to dominate the market by driving prices downward.

Amazon’s Channel on Youtube

If you weren’t able to attend the conference, or want to recap some highlights you might have missed, they have put up a great AWS Channel on Youtube.

Some of the speakers include Sharon Chiarella VP Mechanical Turk, Glenn Hazard, CEO, Xceedium, Todd Barr CMO of Alfresco talks, Bright Fulton, Operations for Swipely, Colin Percival, FreeBSD Developer, Ted Dunning, Chief Application Architect of MapR Technologies, James Broberg, CTO & Founder of MetaCDN, Mitchell Garnaat, Sr. Engineer, David Etue, Vice President, SafeNet, and Mike Culver, Sr. Consultant to name just a few.

Read this far? Grab our Scalable Startups for more tips and special content.

Hacking Job Search – Three Meaty Ideas

Also find the author on twitter @hullsean.

Demand for talented engineers has never been higher. It is in fact the dirty little secret of the startup industry, that there are simply not enough qualified folks to fill the positions.

What this means for you is that you have a lot of options. What it means for a hiring manager is that you will have to work even harder to find the right candidate. Just going to a recruiter isn’t enough. Use your network, go to meetups, follow Gary’s Guide daily.

Also check out our Mythical MySQL DBA piece where we talk about the shortage of DBAs and operations folks.

Further if you’ve dabbled in freelance or independent consulting, I wrote an interesting an in depth look at Why do people leave consulting. Understanding this can help avoid it in your own career, or avoid your resources leaving for better shores.

Find us on twitter @hullsean and linkedin where we share content and ideas everyday!

1. Build your reputation

As they say, your reputation precedes you. So start building it now. Fulltime or freelance, you want to be known.

Speaking, yes you can do it. Start with some small meetups, volunteer to speak on a topic. A ten person room is easier than 30, 50 or 100. Once you have a couple under your belt, fill out a CFP for Velocity, OSCon or some software developers conference. There are many.

Blog – if you’re not already doing so you should. Start with once a week. Comment on industry topics, controversial ideas, or engineering know-how. Prospects can look at this and learn a lot more than from a business card.

Write a book, yes you can. It may sound impossible, but the truth is that publishers are always looking for technical writers. Pick a topic near and dear to you. It’ll also give you endless material for your blog.

Go to meetups, you really need to be getting out there and networking. Get some Moo Business Cards and start working on your elevator pitch!

Social media – being active here helps your blog, and helps people find you. Twitter is a great place to do this. Interact with colleagues and startup founders, VCs and more. If you’re a hiring manager or CTO, you may find great programmers and devops this way.

We also wrote a more in-depth article Consulting and Freelance 101. It’s a three part guide with a lot of useful nugets.

Also take a look at our MySQL DBA Interview Guide which is as helpful to devops and DBAs as it is to managers hiring them!

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Above all else, build your network & your reputation. It will put you in front of more people as a person, not a commodity or a resume in a pile of hundreds.
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2. Qualify prospects

You definitely don’t want to take the first offer you get, and managers don’t want to hire the first candidate that comes along. You want two or three to choose from. Best way to do this is to have options.

If you’re a candidate, network or work through your colleagues. When you do get a lead, be sure you’re speaking to an economic buyer. If you’re not you’ll need to try to find that person who actually signs the checks. They are the ones who ultimately make the decision, so you want to sell yourself to them.

Get a Deposit – I know I know, if it’s your first freelance job, you don’t want to scare them off. Or maybe you do? The only prospects that would be scared off by this are ones who may not pay down the line. Dragging their feet with a deposit can also mean bureaucratic red tap, so be patient too.

Sara Horowitz has an excellent book Freelancers bible, we recommend you grab a copy right now!

Commodity You Are Not so don’t sell yourself as one. What do I mean? You are not an interchangeable part. You have special skills, you have personality, you have things that you’re particularly good at. These traits are what you need to focus on. The dime-a-dozen skills should sit more in the background.

You’ll also need to price and package your services. We talked about this in-depth in Consulting Essentials – Getting the Business.

We also think there is a reason Why Generalists are better at scaling the web.

3. Play the numbers game

For hiring managers this doesn’t mean working through recruiters that might be bringing subpar talent, it means networking through industry events, meetups, startup pitch and venture capital events. There are a few every single day in NYC and there’s no reason not to go to some of them.

For candidates, be eyeing a few different companies, and following up on more than one prospect. You should really think of this process as an integral and enjoyable part of your career, not a temporary in between stage. Networking doesn’t happen overnight, but from a regular process of meeting and engaging with colleagues over years and years in an industry.

At the end of the day hiring is a numbers game so you should play it as such. Keep searching, and always be watching the horizon.

Read this far? Grab our Scalable Startups for more tips and special content.

No iPhones Were Harmed in the Creation of this Outage

Apple’s recent iMessage outage had some users confused. What do you mean I can’t text my favorite cat photos?? How can Apple do this to me!?!?

What happened?

Apple provides services to everyone who uses it’s platform. iCloud for example stores your contacts, calendar, photos, apps and documents in the cloud. No more syncing to itunes to make sure all your stuff is backed up. It’s automatic in the cloud. Yes or course unless iCloud is down.

Same goes for iMessage. Apple has quietly introduced this, as a more feature rich version of text messaging. It’s great until the service isn’t available. What gives?

All these services are backed magically or not so magically by computer servers. These computers sit in datacenters, managed by operations teams, and to some degree with automation. All the things that brought down AWS & AirBNB & Reddit with it could also take out Apple. A serious storm like Sandy also presents real risks.

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iMessage is a text and SMS replacement service for iPhones & iPads. It is more feature rich, offering device synchronization, group texting & return receipt. But in a very big way it is also an attempt for Apple to muscle into the market and further extend it’s platform reach.
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100% uptime ain’t easy

Even for firms that promise insanely good uptime, five nines remains very very hard to achieve in practice.

For starters all the components behind your service, need to be redundant. Multiple load balancers, webservers, caching servers, and of course databases that hold all your business assets.

But as the repeated AWS outages attest, even redundancy here isn’t enough. You also need to use multiple cloud providers. Here you can mirror across clouds so even an outage in one won’t bring down your business.

What about in the world of messaging? Well you can bet your customers don’t likely know or care about high availability, uptime, or any of these other web operations buzzwords. But they sure understand when they can’t use their service. It may give companies like Apple pause as they try to stretch themselves into areas outside their core business of iphones, ipads, and the IOS platform itself.

iMessage – messaging standards power play

When I first upgraded to an iPhone 4S, the first thing I noticed was the light blue bubbles when texting certain people. Why was that, I wondered? I quickly found out about iMessage, which was conveniently configured, to replace my old and trusty text messaging.

Texts or SMS work across all phones, smartphone or not, and apple or not. But open standards don’t lend themselves well to market muscle and dominance. So it makes sense that Apple would be pushing into this space. I met more than one blackberry owner who loved using bbm to keep in touch with colleagues. It’s like your own private club. And that muscle further strengthens Apple’s platform overall. Just take a look at how the Android Ecosystem is broken if you need an example of what not to do.

The flip side is it means you have more to manage. More servers, more services, more dimensions to your business. More frequent outages that can tarnish your reputation.

[quote]
A lot complaining and publicity like the iMessage outage received, may just be an indication that you’re big enough for people to care.
[/quote]

Alternatives abound…

There is huge competition in the messaging space. The outage and it’s publicity further underline this fact.

For example on the iPhone for messaging there is ChatOn, Whatsapp, LINE, SKYPE & wechat just to name a few.

Interestingly, while researching this article, I downloaded WhatsApp to give it a try. Only 99 cents, why not. Turns out that they had not one, but two outages, just a week ago. Seems Apple isn’t the only one experiencing growing pains.

A lot of complaining and publicity could be a sign that you’re big enough for people to care!

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