Category Archives: CTO/CIO

Is Amazon too big to fail?

aws fault tolerance

Amazon is the huge online retailer everyone knows well. However there is another side of Amazon, namely Amazon Web Services that hosts many of the internets largest websites.

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

In the infrastructure & operations world, Amazon is the Citibank, JP Morgan or Goldman Sachs of cloud providers.

1. Outage takes down Yelp & Netflix

As reported on Thousand Eyes among other places, Amazon had a major outage yesterday.

Amazon experienced a problem with how they route data over the network. Routing is the technical term for how the internet moves data around. When routing goes wrong at a provider like Amazon, the websites they host will go down too.

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

2. Automation can’t save you

Netflix is famous for their great streaming service, and shows like House of Cards.

On the technology side they’re also pretty famous. They deploy legions of Amazon servers to stream movies using Chaos Monkey. This open source suite allows them to remain resilient even if individual servers or components go offline.

Yet a heavy reliance on Amazon itself, meant a wider outage for them was also an outage for Netflix.

Related: What tech do startups use most?

3. Of cloud monopolies

Amazon’s dominance in the cloud hosting space is incredible. There are providers that can beat them in compute power, speed & price. But with their incredible reach of global datacenters & relentless growth they are still the first choice for most internet shops.

What is the downside of such dominance? What happened yesterday illustrates it clearly. When Amazon goes down, so do financial companies like Experian,

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Diversify your data portfolio

In the banking world we can put together legislation, regulating banks. We can enact capital requirements or consider breaking up the largest ones. For investors & consumers you can diversify your portfolio, putting money in different asset classes & institutions. If one fund fails, others will balance it out.

We can do the same with cloud hosting. For larger internet applications, deploying on multiple clouds can be very beneficial. In that case an outage at Amazon, would merely mean your global load balancer kicks in, sending traffic to your plan B servers.

Also: Replicate big data to Amazon Redshift with Tungsten

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon ?

storm coming

One look at StackShare’s trending technologies, and you’ll discover the exploding growth of languages, webservers, load balancers, databases, caching servers, automation & monitoring tools, continuous integration suites & a broad spectrum of Software as a service solutions.

The choices today boggles the mind. Choice is good, but too much choice can mean trouble too.

Join 30,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. What am I actually using?

Erich Schubert wrote a superb piece about the sad state of the sysadmin in the age of containers. Here’s what caught my eye:

Stack is the new term for “I have no idea what I’m actually using”.

That definitely rings true for me. The customers I’m seeing these days have such complicated stacks, that nobody really knows what’s installed. That’s dangerous!

Also: Do today’s startups assemble at their own risk?

2. Embrace failure more broadly

Recently I wrote a blog post asking Is AWS the patient that needs constant medication?. It got a lot of traction, and here’s why I think that happened.

AWS uses very commodity, cheapo components. The assumption is, with an infinitely redundant datacenter, component failure is ok. It’s ordinary & everyday.

Unfortunately most startups, even ones that employ some Ansible & devops, still don’t have Netflix grade automation.

Those regularly everyday failures are still getting detected by old-school manual monitoring. And that’s a recipe for trouble

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

3. What are complex systems?

In this excellent deck, James Urquhart talks about emergent behavior in complex systems. It’s worth a quick read.

***

Read: How I find entrepreneurial focus

4. What to do? Do you like boring?

Dan McKinley formerly principal engineer at Etsy & now with Stripe wrote a brilliant essay arguing for boring technology.

This comes as a shock to many in the startup world. It sort of smacks in the face of open source, or does it?

I worked in the enterprise space as an Oracle DBA for a decade starting in the mid-nineties. Among DBAs there was always a chuckle when a new version of Oracle came out. No one wanted to touch it with a ten foot pole. Sure we’d install it on test boxes, start learning the new features and so forth. But deploy it? No way, wait a good 2 or even 3 years before upgrading.

Meanwhile management was eager for the latest software. Don’t we want the newest? The Oracle sales guys would be selling the virtues of all sorts of features that nobody needed right away anyway.

Choosing boring components takes discipline to fight sexy new technologies & bleeding edge versions. But staid & stodgy wins you everyday in operations uptime.

Related: Is automation killing old-school operations?

5. Use tried & tested components

Do you find your application or stack contains java, ruby, python & PHP? Choose one.

One webserver like nginx, one caching server like memcache or redis, one search server like solr or elasticsearch, one database like MySQL or postgres. Standardize all your components on one image, so you can use that for all your servers, regardless of which you use.

Fewer components will mean fewer interdependencies, less maintenance, & less chaos.

Also: What’s the luckiest thing that’s happened in your career?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

What happens when entrepreneurs treat data as a product?

Sneachta Pix

Sneachta Pix

I’ve been reading DJ Patil’s thoughts on building data products. As the chief data scientist of the united states, he knows a thing or two.

Join 30,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I also attended a recent Look & Tell event, where Lincoln Ritter talked about Data Democracy at Animoto. He expressed many of Patil’s lessons.

I took away a few key lessons from these that seem to be repeating refrains…

1. UX of data

UX design involves looking at how customers actually use a product in the real world. What parts of the product work for them, how they flow through that product and so on.

That same design sense can be applied to data. At high level that means exposing data in a measured, meaningful & authoritative way. Not all the tables & all the data points but rather key ones that help the business make decisions. Then layering on top discovery tools like Looker to allow the biz-ops to make more informed decisions.

Also: 5 Reasons to move data to Amazon Redshift

2. Be iterative

Clean data, presented to business operations in a meaningful way, allows them to explore the data, and find useful trends. What’s more with good discovery tools, biz-ops is empowered to do their own reporting.

All this reduces the need to go to engineering for each report. It reduces friction and facilitates faster iteration. That’s agile!

Related: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Be authoritative

Handing the keys to the data kingdom over to business means more eyes on the prize. That may well surface data inconsistencies. Each such case can reduce trust on your data.

Being authoritative means building checks into your data feeds, and identifying where data is amiss. Then fixing it at the source.

Read: Are SQL Databases dead?

4. Spot checks & balances

Spot checks on data are like unit tests on code. They keep you honest. Those rules for how your business works, and what your data should look like, can be captured in code, then applied as tests against source data.

Also: Is Apple betting against big data?

5. Monitoring for data outages

As data is treated as a product, it should be monitored just like other production systems. A data inconsistency or failed spot check then becomes an “outage”. By taking these very seriously, and fire fighting just as you do other production systems, you can build trust in that data, as those fires become less frequent.

Also: Why Airbnb didn’t have to fail

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

How I find entrepreneurial focus

Brian K

Relentless focus. This is surely a key to entrepreneurial success. But how to find it? And how to maintain that focus through the ups & downs?

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I’ve found a simple system with a few rules has brought me success. I’ve used it for two decades of as entrepreneurial, and still do.

Here’s how it works…

1. keep a list of small tasks

This is the number one thing I do daily. I start out early in the morning, over coffee. Anything that “needs to get done” goes on the todo list, but I also separate out the things I’ll do today.

Todo list items are not big ones, like “save the world” or “get new job”. They are small nuggets of work that take 15 to 60 minutes. If they’re larger, they need to be broken down.

A typical day covers five major tasks. You will get sidetracked. You’ll need to answer calls & emails that aren’t captured on the list.

All this sounds simple, but it actually requires a discipline. Both to keep tasks actionable & small. You’ll learn your work pace with practice. But there’s one more thing to remember.

Also: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

2. trust the list

One thing I find myself doing is pushing just because something is on the list.

I don’t do list based on feelings or moods

This requires a lot of habit building, but it becomes valuable. By doing this over time, you begin to trust the list. You know things on it will get done. So you can safely “add it to the list” and forget about it for the moment.

This lets your mind relax and bcomes a real godsend when you have a mountain of work to do.

Just work list because it’s there. And trust that things that need to get done simply go on the list.

Related: Why airbnb didn’t have to fail

3. done with list, done for day

On days where things get hairy, and you work more, you’ll have to slog through to get everything on the list done. But sticking to it will build a habit that’s valuable.

At the same time some days will be easier. Avoid the temptation to add more work to fill the day.

When you’re done with the list, you’re done for the day

This is a discipline too. Pat yourself on the back, and give yourself a break. You did what you said you would do. Time for a beer. :)

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

4. big projects require faith

Anothe lesson I’ve learned is that really large projects, or ones bringing you into new areas, require a lot of faith. For me, with an engineering background, I don’t have an easy time finding that. I want to measure, and dice up everything from the start.

When I was embarking on a project to buy real estate in Brooklyn, I really learned this lesson. There was so much unknown. How do I work with real estate brokers that have a different style of communicating than engineers & corporate professionals? How do I negotiate? What’s the right price? What about mortgages & their brokers? Architect inspections, land surveys, flood zones, crime maps, loans & assets, legal & closing costs. The list of unknown & nebulous areas of expertise was staggering.

Hang around edges to get lay of land

If I would distill this faith idea down for someone embarking on a new career or diving into a pool of unknown depth, I would say start by hanging around the edges. Pick off pieces that you can, and add them to the todo list.

I went to open houses. I asked questions. I researched online, and I always made sure I understood how agents & players were incentivized. That means believing none of the words people speak, but rather, look behind the curtain and make educated guesses about those realities.

Also: Do todays startups assemble at their own risk?

5. break down & do

It is inevitable that you will experience writers block. Or any other kind of block that manifests as procrastination. Don’t over think it.

Continue to break down to smallest viable unit that you *can* do.

get started on anything to get inertia

With writing I find blocks where I don’t have a solid idea formulated. Maybe you have a topic? So then my todo list for the day is “write five bullet points”. This by itself will take some time, but you know you can write something. By moving past your block, I sometimes find I wanna keep writing and finish the piece. This is the kind of habit you want to form.

Also: Is Fred Wilson right to say speed is a feature?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

5 Things I learned from Fred Wilson & Mark Suster

I was recently flipping through AVC.com and saw this interview by Mark Suster of Upfront Ventures. He talks in depth with veteran in the VC world, Fred Wilson.

Join 30,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Here’s a more in-depth blog post on Mark’s interview with Fred Wilson from Union Square Ventures.

1. I’m not into debt

Around the 20:25 in the interview, Fred is discussing a period in his career before some of his first big investments, where things were financially challenging. He makes a rather candid comment about personal debt:

“I’m not that kinda person. I don’t like debt. I’m not into debt”

I think this is key. I also think it frames the whole way people approach business & career.

Also: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

2. Brains & hustle is key

Among the most successful entrepreneurs there are certainly many who are very intellectually astute. Meanwhile there are others who are great speakers, who can sell an idea, and persuade, but perhaps not as deep product wise or deeply technical.

The very best though, tend to have both brains & hustle.

Related: 8 questions to ask an AWS expert

3. Best technology doesn’t win markets

Around 11:45 in the interview, Mark & Fred are discussing Novell & Banyan.

“That was when I learned that best technology doesn’t win markets”

t’s interesting because as you hear the story of how Banyan lost out to Novell, it resonates today with companies that often have the best tech, but don’t win in markets. Interesting.

Read: Why Airbnb didn’t have to fail

4. Find answers through blogging

“It’s like Venus Fly Paper. When I write about topics that are relevant, suddenly anybody with a startup solution in that field will approach us. This works brilliantly.”

Indeed, I’ve found blogging to be crucial myself to career building. It helps in a myriad of ways.

Blogging brings visibility, as your blog gains in popularity. That is certainly big. But also it helps you craft & formalize your voice & your vision. Blogging asks you everyday to think about your perspective, and share it in a way that appeals to a broad audience. And analytics give you real feedback that you are saying something of value to people.

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Listen to the younger generation

Around 1:11:15 in the interview, there’s an interesting point where Mark asks Fred if there were any deals that they regret not getting into. Fred responds that AirBNB was such a deal, as it was a quintessential Union Square ventures company.

As it turns out they didn’t invest because they couldn’t imagine using the service. Meanwhile the younger members of their team had a different perspective.

“We’re not gonna reject anything that we wouldn’t do and the younger team would.”

Interesting point. I think of Venmo as another example of this. I personally wouldn’t use the service, meanwhile it is clearly very popular among teen & twenty something demographic.

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

What’s the luckiest thing that’s happened in your career?

sashi [via Flickr]

I was browsing through Career Dean recently, a site that facilitates professionals to share knowledge & experience with more junior & recent college grads about the work world. It’s a great site. I saw the question What’s the luckiest thing that’s ever happened for your career?

I read in John Adam’s AMA his “million dollar piss” (www.careerdean.com/q/howd-you-get-the-job-twitter), which he sowed the seeds of his success basically during a piss. That’s a 1 in a million kind of story I know. I’d like to hear if anyone else has ever experienced anything remotely lucky in that way? =) something fun to come back and read if anyone answers.

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Here’s how I responded…

I moved to NYC & worked at a tiny startup in the mid-nineties. Got to do Mac stuff, windows & Sun Solaris unix as well. Jumped on an Oracle project where I was a bit underwater. The firm hired a consultant to assist me for a few days. I watched what he did and learned like a sponge. Within a few months I dove into Oracle consulting and never looked back.

I felt this was an amazingly lucky opportunity to for a few reasons.

1. DIY

I’ve been consulting for almost twenty years now. And I get asked all the time how to get into freelance or independent consulting. For me the jumping off point was working for a really small ten person startup.

An environment like this is very different from a large corporation where you do one thing. At a tiny shop, everything is very do-it-yourself. You have to be self-serve & lean. It’s a constant challenge to teach yourself what you don’t already know. It’s a very vibrant environment as you enter your career.

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

2. Generalist

I also found that I had the chance to really apply everything I learned in computer science. It’s a hardware problem? It’s a software problem? These kind of silos that you experience at university don’t apply. One day you can be doing windows, mac, or Unix operating system configuration, the next you can be writing code. And on the third day you can be doing dba work.

In today’s terminology, this role was site reliability engineer or SRE, fullstack developer, tech support, evangelist, CTO, DBA, scalability & performance lead and more.

Related: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

3. Cutting edge

Startups to be sure are on the bleeding edge. They’re constrained by budgets, and through sheer will & experimentation, are cutting their teeth on the newest technologies out there.

These days that might be Cassandra & Kafka, Docker, MongoDB, hdfs, Redshift and so on.

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Ok to Fail

In larger enterprises, a lot of politics weigh on decisions, and exotic technologies are risky. When you’re at a startup, and by design you are entering uncharted waters, it’s sort of a given that it is ok to fail. This encourages learning, as there is less risk of failure.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

5. Iterative & Agile

We talk about being agile, and lean at startups. At a very small place like this, you have one or two developers, and you deploy code constantly. It’s agile by default. And that’s a good thing.

Also: Is high availability overrated? The myth of five nines.

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Best of Startup Content on Scalable Startups

strawberries

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Costs

Costs of techops can involve short-term architectural, decisions, but what about the longer term affects of choices? Do cto’s underestimate operational costs?

A stack of…

These days the full stack of a internet or mobile startup involves a lot of varied components, from Chef, Puppet & Ansible, to Nginx, haproxy, redis, solr and some database like MySQL or Postgres on the relational end of the spectrum, or Mongodb, Hbase or Cassandra on the NoSQL side. What type of challenges does this pose to a team? I’m curious,
Do startups assemble at their own risk?

Most used tech

Leo Polovets ran some stats over the Angellist data of startups. He wanted to know Which tech do startups use most? and I summarized the results.

Death of ops?

These days with all the talk of automation, I’ve heard heard developers & even CTO’s argue of a diminishing need for backend administrators. Do startups still need techops?

Speed as a feature

Is Fred Wilson right to say speed is a feature? What does this mean for those migrating or already running in the cloud? How does scalability come into play?

Avoiding outages

Are many outages avoidable? Did Airbnb have to fail?

Performance Review

Reviewing architecture & site speed is a type of engagement that a lot of startups can benefit from. Here’s my Anatomy of a performance review.

Let things fail

Does it sometimes make sense to let things break a little? A tale of managed failure.

Young founders

I worked at one startup with a CTO just out of college. Although they were flush with cash & had real problems scaling, communication problems ultimately soured the engagement. Are you too young to be a boss?

80 million fix

Sometimes fixing serious performance bottlenecks can get a site back up on it’s feet. In this success story they went on to get acquired weeks after the fix. In tongue in cheek fashion I askWhere’s my 80 million dollars?

CTO’s should never do

There are times to get into the trenches. But what if it sacrifices leadership?What should a CTO never do?

Startups too cool for school

Joining YC but have no ideas? No problem. Is my startup too cool for your business school?

Instant business, just add water

Can a business be built in just a weekend? Is there a problem with startup bootcamps?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

What can NYFW teach Chad Dickerson about net neutrality?

net neutrality

Here we are again discussing Net Neutrality… Chad Dickerson CEO of well renowned Etsy.com, has come out strongly in favor, and wants everyone to take action.

Join 27,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Honestly when I read his wired piece Etsy CEO to businesses: If Net Neutrality Perishes, We Will Too, I was struck by one statement:

The FCC proposal will threaten *ANY* business that uses the internet to reach it’s customers.

Any business? Quite a sweeping statement. Strikes fear into me that’s for sure… And if you read through the comments, the debate is equally fierce. One side says net neutrality is socialism! The other side says anyone against net neutrality is a shill for Comcast or Verizon! Battle lines drawn!

1. Are all businesses at risk?

Isn’t the idea that ETSY will perish overstated? Are they a high bandwidth company? Are they trying to stream video?
Is the entire Etsy community alarmed? Isn’t that a rather broad statement?

To be sure ending net neutrality will impact some businesses. Perhaps one reason VC’s like Fred Wilson are so concerned about Net Neutrality isn’t for the freedom of millions of internet users, but the threat to disruptive businesses, the startups that VC’s directly invest in.

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

2. Will all internet users be impacted?

Here again some of this debate seems overstated. I remember using the internet on a dialup modem. 300 baud, was about the speed at which you can type. Then along came 14.4, 28k and upward speeds climbed. All the while the internet was usable. Could I do all the things I can today, nope.

Even if these horrible Comcast’s & Verizon’s reduce speeds by 100 times, they will still be plenty fast for most internet users. Sure streaming video would be impacted, and yes streaming music would be impacted. But for end users, I would argue most would not be impacted. It is rather the disruptive startups & businesses that would be most impacted.

Also: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Are there anti-EDU parallels

In the mid-nineties, before the dot-com bubble, there was a huge raging debate about even having commercial entities on the internet at all. Enlightened internet cognoscenti considered it an abomination.

But the real world pushed it’s nose in, and today we take as a given.

Check this: Is Hunter Walk right about operations & startups?

4. Is google right about millisecond delays?

“Research from Google & Microsoft shows that delays of milliseconds result in fewer page views and fewer sales in both the short & long term”. Yep, that’s a fact. The research shows this. But what do we take away from that?

As a performance and scalability consultant I see a *TON* of websites that have huge delays, well over tiny millisecond ones that Google frets over. Internet startups struggle with performance every day.

What’s the irony? Slowdowns that Comcast or Verizon might introduce to end users pale in comparison with these larger systemic problems.

Also: 5 Ways startups misstep on scalability

5. Any lessons from sites of New York Fashion Week?

I like the Pingdom speed test tool. I used it to track the speed of some of the websites & blogs that are big for NYFW. Here’s what I found:

nyfw speed test results

What do you see? Take a look at the SIZE column. Notice something strange? The LARGEST sites, in terms of images, css & assets aren’t necessarily the SLOWEST! That’s a funny result if you consider net neutrality. If you think the network speed is the same for all websites, shouldn’t the smallest pages load fastest?

Not true at all. It’s a very simplistic way of viewing things. Fashionista.com for example is doing a ton of tuning behind the scenes. As you can see it is making their site far and away the fastest! Network bandwidth and net neutrality be damned!

Related: Are SQL Databases Dead?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is automation killing old-school operations?

puppet logo

Join 27,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I was shocked to find this article on ReadWrite: The Truth About DevOps: IT Isn’t Dead; It’s not even Dying. Wait a second, do people really think this?

Truth is I have heard whispers of this before. I was at a meetup recently where the speaker claimed “With more automation you can eliminate ops. You can then spend more on devs”. To an audience of mostly developers & startup founders, I can imagine the appeal.

1. Does less ops mean more devs?

If you’re listening to a platform service sales person or a developer who needs more resources to get his or her job done, no one would be surprised to hear this. If we can automate away managing the stack, we’ll be able to clear the way for the real work that needs to be done!

This is a very seductive perspective. But it may be akin to taking on technical debt, ignoring the complexity of operations and the perspective that can inform a longer view.

chef logo

Puppet Labs’ Luke Kanies says “Become uniquely valuable. Become great at something the market finds useful.”. I couldn’t agree more.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

2. What happens when developers leave?

I would argue that ops have a longer view of product lifecycle. I for one have been brought in to many projects after the first round of developers have left, and teams are trying to support that software five years after the first version was built.

That sort of long term view, of how to refresh performance, and revitalize code is a unique one. It isn’t the “building the future” mindset, the sexy products, and disruptive first mover “we’re changing the world” mentality.

It’s a more stodgy & conservative one. The mindset is of reliability, simplicity, and long term support.

Also: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

3. What’s your mandate?

From what I’ve seen, devs & ops are divided by a four letter word.

That word I believe is “risk”. Devs have a mandate from the business to build features & directly answer to customer requests today. Ops have a mandate to reliability, working against change and thinking in terms of making all that change manageable.

Different mandates mean different perspectives.

Related: What is Devops & why is it important?

4. Can infrastructure live as code?

Puppet along with infrastructure automation & configuration management tools like Chef offer the promise of fully automated infrastructure. But the truth is much much more complex. As typical technology stacks expand from load balancer, webserver & database, to multiple databases, caching server, search server, puppet masters, package repositories, monitoring & metrics collection & jump boxes we’re all reaching a saturation point.

Yes automation helps with that saturation, but ultimately you need people with those wide ranging skills, to manage the complex web of dependencies when things fail.

And fail they will.

Check out: Why are MySQL DBA’s and ops so hard to find?

5. ORM’s and architecture

If you aren’t familiar, ORM’s are a rather dry sounding name for a component that is regularly overlooked. It’s a middleware sitting between application & database, and they drastically simplify developers lives. It helps them write better code and get on with the work of delivering to the business. It’s no wonder they are popular.

But as Ward Cunningham elloquently explains, they are surely technical debt that eventually must get paid. Indeed.

There is broad agreement among professional DBA’s. Each query should be written, each one tuned, and each one deployed. Just like any other bit of code. Handing that process to a library is doomed to failure. Yet ORM’s are still evolving, and the dream still lives on.

And all that because devs & ops have a completely different perspective. We need both of them to run modern internet applications. Lets not forget folks. :)

Read this: Do managers and CTO’s underestimate operational costs?

Want more? Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Do we need another book on communicating?

supercommunicator

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I had to ask the question. There are so many books on communicating & presenting affectively, it begs the question, what can this book do that others haven’t?

While it’s a fair question, I don’t necessarily think it stands with peers. That said it’s a new book, with a new tone, preaching many of the best advice and doing it with a flair. If you’ve read a ton of communication books, you may not find something new, but if the topic is one you’re just digging into, Pietrucha is a great place to start.

1. Jobs vs Gates – inspired presentations

If you’ve ever seen these two companies CEO’s do new product demos, you’ll immediately get it. You don’t have to be an apple fanboy to appreciate how Jobs presents without buzzwords, and cuts to the heart of our hearts.

That means don’t get mired in jargon, speak to our passions, and be your own ambassador.

Also: Do managers underestimate operational costs?

2. Lead with a story & a question

In a recent discussion with a prospect I was asked about one experience that stood out over the years of consulting.

One popped into my head of a dot-com startup in the late 90′s. The company was trying to close an acquisition deal, but the web application was sick & feverish. My first few days involved conversations with lead engineers, DBA & operations team members. As I turn over more stones, I found a key component, the database, misconfigured. I sifted through configurations, and found the setup lacking. The server was using only 5% of memory. Some of the settings were even still at their default. Changing the right ones allowed the machine to flex it’s muscles like a marathon runner taken off a starvation diet. Things improved very quickly, and the site returned to a snappy responsive self.

The CEO beamed with approval, and just a few weeks later the firm was purchased for over 80 million dollars. Not bad work if you can get it. :)

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

3. Drop the vernacular & speak broadly

After recently doing some writing for muckrack on how to reach pitch journalists and then at Infoworld getting started with Amazon EC2. I’ve learned a ton. Having a professional editor explain what they want really puts things in perspective.

Editors will start by talking about their audience. If you’re a blogger, do you know who your audience is, and what they really get from your site? There may be many answers. Once you get your audience, how can you speak to all of them? In my case, I have readers who are programmers & devops, then I have CEO’s & VCs. But it doesn’t stop there. What about recruiters, and hiring managers? How about random internet searchers, and students?

All of these folks can get something from my site, and using broad language allows everyone to be within reach. Don’t sacrifice depth, but use language and stories to make your point.

Check this: 5 ways startups misstep on scalability

4. Analogies that resonate

I attend a lot of mini conferences, meetups, drinkups & social events in nyc. I find it’s one of the keys to success in consulting.

In an endless sea of conversations, you will find yourself talking about what your day-to-day business is all about. In my early years in nyc, these conversations would consist of technically correct descriptions, followed by glazed eyes, and a quick change of subject. After this happens often enough you start to wonder, how can I share such a technical description to a broader audience?

Truth is it’s only technical because you know so much about it. If I stand back I might say I’m “a sort of specialized surgeon for the internet”, or “a traffic cop of sorts, for the information highway we all share”, or better yet “a plumber, that you call when your pipes are backed up and your customers are screaming”.

Whichever analogy I use, I see eyes light up, and a look of understanding. “Oh I can see how that would be an important specialization”. Indeed.

The right analogy makes all the difference!

Related: Are startup CEO’s hiding their scalability problems?

5. Put your words on the chopping block

If you haven’t already done so, start chopping. Sentences & paragraphs all benefit from shortening & edit. Distill your big ideas in summary and let the story lend the detail. Your audience will pay closer attention, and see the big picture you are trying to share.

The guys at 37 signals do this eloquently in RE:Work .

Read this: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters