A History lesson for Cloud Detractors

Computing history

We’ve all seen cloud computing discussed ad nauseam on blogs, on Twitter, Quora, Stack Exchange, your mom’s Facebook page… you get the idea. The tech bloggers and performance experts often pipe in with their graphs and statistics showing clearly that dollar-for-dollar, cloud hosted virtual servers can’t compete with physical servers in performance, so why is everyone pushing them? It’s just foolhardy, they say.

On the other end, management and their bean counters would simply roll their eyes saying this is why the tech guys aren’t running the business.

Seriously, why the disconnect? Open source has always involved a lot of bushwacking…

Continue reading “A History lesson for Cloud Detractors”

Seattle Web Tech Meetup Nov 21

I’ll be one of two speakers at the next Seattle Web Technology Bi-Weekly Meet up on Nov 21 at the Citrus Lounge.

They’ve sexed it up a little by calling it a face-off between Windows Azure and Amazon EC2  (no prizes for guessing which side I represent) but really it’s going to be a primer on the Platform-as-a service and Infrastructure-as-a-service models. I expect some lively discussions during Q&A.

I’ll be covering questions such as what cloud computing is, what EC2 provides, what is datacenter automation and the differences between a standard datacenter liks Rackspace and Amazon EC2. Meanwhile you folks who’ve  large investments in say EXCHANGE servers will be able to pose questions to Marcus Wendt of Composite C1.

It’s Amex sponsored and you’ll get a ticket good for a beer or a Citrus signature drink with which you can get cozy and warm up by the fireplace while Marcus and I are beamed through a flat screen with our respective presentations. If you’re in Seattle drop in. I hope to see you or at least, hear you there.

$1000 per hour Servers, Anyone?

Amazon’s spot market for computing power is set up as an open market for surplus servers. The price is dynamic and depends on demand. So when demand is low, you can get computing instances for rock bottom prices. When you do that you normally set a range of prices you’re willing to pay. If it goes over your top end, your instances get killed and re-provisioned for someone else. Obviously this wouldn’t work for all applications, like a website that has to be up all the time, but for computing power, say to run some huge hedge fund analytics, it might fit perfectly. Continue reading “$1000 per hour Servers, Anyone?”

Oracle Announces Paid MySQL Add-ons

 Oracle starts charging for MySQL Add-ons

Exciting news, Oracle just announced commercial MySQL extensions that they’ll be offering paid extensions to the core MySQL free product.

To be sure, this has raised waves of concern among the community, but on the whole I suspect it will be a good thing for MySQL.  This brings more commercial addons to the table, which only increases the options for customers.  Many will continue to use the core database product only, and avoid license hassles while others will surely embark on a hybrid approach if it solves their everyday business problems. Continue reading “Oracle Announces Paid MySQL Add-ons”

5 Scalability Pitfalls to Avoid

1. Object Relational Mappers

Software development has always made use of libraries, off-the-shelf components that are shared between different projects.  These allow you to stand on the shoulders of others and build bigger things.  Frameworks do the same thing, they provide a context from which to build on.  Ruby on Rails for example provides a great starting framework from which to build web applications, managing sessions in an elegant way. Continue reading “5 Scalability Pitfalls to Avoid”

Top 3 Questions From Clients

1. This page or area of the website is very slow, why?

There are a lot of components that make up modern internet websites, and a lot of places to get stuck in the mud.  Website performance starts with the browser, what caching it is doing, their bandwidth to your server, what the webserver is doing (caching or not and how), if the webserver has sufficient memory, and then what the application code is doing and lastly how it is interacting with the backend database. Continue reading “Top 3 Questions From Clients”

Open Source Enables the Cloud

With the fast growth of virtualized data centers, and companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook, it’s easy to forget how much is built on open-source components, aka commodity software.  In a very real way open-source has enabled the huge explosion of commodity hardware, the fast growth of the internet itself, and now the further acceleration through cloud services, cloud infrastructure, and virtualization of data centers.

Your typical internet stack and application now stands on the shoulders of tens of thousands of open source developers and projects.  Let’s look at a few of them. Continue reading “Open Source Enables the Cloud”

Cloud for Burst Capacity

One very strong case for cloud computing is that it can satisfy applications with seasonal traffic patterns.  One way to test the advantages of the cloud is through a hybrid approach.

Cloud infrastructure can be built completely through scripts.  You can spinup specific AMIs or machine images, automatically install and update packages, install your credentials, startup services, and you’re running.

All of these steps can be performed in advance of your need at little cost.  Simply build and test.  When you’re finished, shutdown those instances.  What you walk away with is scripts.  What do we mean?

The power here is that you carry zero costs for that burst capacity until you need it.  You’ve already build the automation scripts, and have them in place.  When your capacity planning warrants it, spinup additional compute power, and watch your internet application scale horizontally.  Once your busy season is over, scale back and disable your usage until you need it again.