Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Why I Wrote the Book – Oracle and Open Source

Back in the late 90′s New York City was deep in the dot-com boom. Silicon Alley was being born, and a thousand internet startups were sprouting. Everyone was hiring, it was an exciting time to work in technology!

Join 11,500 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Trend Spotting Circa 2000

As an independent consultant, I had the opportunity to work at quite a few startups. The technology stack was identical at almost all of them. Sun Microsystems hardware, Apache webservers, and Oracle on the backend. The database was always the sticking point, and developers struggled to get their queries right.

It was an interesting role to hold. Most career DBAs worked at large fortune 500 firms, the old stodgy kind where nothing ever changes. Few of the Oracle old guard, the kind you’d meet at User Groups or conferences, had much exposure to Linux, and they certainly didn’t trust it.

Also: Here’s how to do a scalability performance review

Meanwhile in the startup scene in NYC I was seeing the cutting edge uses of the technology, with more and more shops switching to Linux and commodity hardware. There was even talk of *gasp* Oracle porting to Linux. There was a real rumor mill around all of this.

Oracle and Open Source Published – 2001

Seeing this shift towards commodity hardware, and the tremendous demand for Oracle married with open source technologies, I pitched O’Reilly and Associates with a book idea. Let’s talk about what’s happening in the trenches. How and when does Oracle – the most commercial of relational databases, work with Open Source technologies? What is in the mix? What are real firms using it for? What tools and technologies can help firms grow faster?

Related: Oracle DBA Interview questions for managers, candidates & recruiters alike

These were the questions my co-author and I sought to answer, and to judge from the response I think we did a very good job. As that push continued, Oracle eventually ported it’s enterprise database to Linux. This was a seismic shift that meant existing Oracle customers would spend a lot less on hardware, and thus have more to spend on Oracle licenses. Win-win except for Sun. The trend continued with Oracle pushing Apache into the mix as well.

Fast Forward a Decade

Now a decade later, Oracle has bought it’s former partner Sun, and in so doing owns MySQL too.

Read this: Top MySQL Interview questions for Devops, managers & recruiters

What new trends are happening? We hear an incessant drum of hype around cloud computing. In many ways the trend parallels what happened a decade ago. See our related piece a history lesson for cloud detractors. How so?

[quote]Commoditization: push towards new platforms, driven by cost. [/quote]

But this is slowed by an equally large stumbling block.

[quote]Performance: new cloud servers can’t compete with their big iron cousins. Not yet at least.[/quote]

Interested in Amazon EC2? We wrote an Intro to EC2 Cloud Deployments article which digs in deeper.

What’s Next for Datacenters

Commiditization will continue, driving costs downward. This will provide more gravity to cloud migrations for firms big and small.

Performance will improve. Cloud services like Amazon EC2 will get bigger & better, as will the all important network & disk subsystems.

Also: 5 things toxic to scalability

Big enterprises are already dipping their feet in the water with VPC technology, tying their existing datacenter to a cloud. They can grow elastically while still having feet firmly planted on the ground.

As large enterprises begin to get experience behind the wheel, it’ll chip away at the stranglehold of Oracle and the huge taxation type licensing that firms struggle with today. Where salesforce.com had a huge impact, workday.com will be even bigger.

[quote]The cloud will finally disrupt the last old guard industry – enterprise software.[/quote]

Read this far? Get us monthly in your inbox. Grab our scalable startups newsletter!

Ask Me Questions – Scalability, Performance, Cloud Computing

 

 

I blog a lot about various topics near and dear to me.  So I thought I’d turn the tables a bit, and offer the microphone up to readers.  Do you have questions on any of these topics?  Feel free to drop a note in the comments.

 

Business & Consulting

Are you a freelancer or independent consultant?  Struggling with some part of the business?  Or are you a CTO or Director looking to hire short term talent?  Glad to offer up advice and suggestions, just fire away!

Scalability

The goal of every hypergrowth company, from Pinterest to Facebook, Zynga to FourSquare.  How do they achieve it?  What architecture decisions make those applications grow effortlessly to meet user demand?  I’m sure you have some questions!

Performance

It’s on everyone’s mind, especially in the context of deploying in the cloud.  How best to achieve good performance?  Are you struggling with something specific?

High Availability

We want our systems to be available 24x7x 3million days a year!  Is it feasible?  What should we aim for in the real world?  Does our technology mix and hosting factor into the equation?  Ask away.

Startup Challenges

I’ve worked with a lot of startups over the years.  From the dot-com hey days to the more sober field we see before us today.  Many struggle with similar challenges.  Am glad to offer up comments and suggestions from what I’ve learned over the years.

Cloud Computing

What really works in the cloud? Is Amazon EC2 the only way to go?  What are the pros and cons of going with a Rackspace type provider that also has great service and the physical data center option?  How will I get good performance?  These and other questions are on everyone’s lips.  Feel free to comment if you have some concerns.

 

3 things CEOs should know about the Cloud

You’ve heard all the buzz and spiel about the cloud, and there’re good reasons to want to get there. On-demand compute power makes new levels of scalability possible. Low up front costs means moving capital expenditure to operating expenditure and saving a bundle in the process. We won’t give you anymore of the rah rah marketing hoopla. You’ve heard enough of that. We’ll gently play devil’s advocate for a moment, and give you a few things to think about when deploying applications with a cloud provider. Our focus is mainly on Amazon EC2.

You might also be interested in a wide reaching introduction to deploying on Amazon EC2.

  1. Funky Performance
  2. One of the biggest hurdles we see clients struggle with on Amazon EC2 is performance. This is rooted in the nature of shared resources. Computer servers, just like desktops rely on CPUs, Memory, Network and Disk. In the virtual datacenter, you can be given more than your fair share without you even knowing it. More bandwidth, more CPU, more disk? Who would complain? Well if your application behaves erratically, while you suddenly compete for disk resources you’ll quickly feel the flip side of that coin. Stocks go up, and they can just as easily come right back down.

    Variability around disk I/O seems to be the one that hits applications the hardest, especially the database tier of many web applications. If your application requires extremely high database transaction throughput, you would do well to consider physical servers and a real RAID array to host your database server. Read more about IOPs

  3. Uncertain Reliability – A Loaded Gun
  4. Everybody has heard the saying, don’t hand someone a loaded gun. In the case of Amazon servers, you really do load your applications onto fickle and neurotic servers.

    Imagine you open a car rental business. You could have two brand new fully reliable cars to rent out to customers. Your customers would be very happy, but you’d have a very small business. Alternatively you could have twenty used Pintos. You’d have some breaking down a lot, but as long as you keep ten of them rented at a time, your business is booming.

    In the Amazon world you have all the tools to keep your Ford Pintos running, but it’s important to think long and hard about reliability, redundancy, and automation. Read more about Failures, Lessons & the Chaos Monkey

  5. Iffy Support
  6. Managed hosting providers vary drastically in terms of the support you can expect. Companies like Rackspace, Servint or Datapipe have Support built into their DNA. They’ve grown up around having a support tech that your team can reach when they’re having trouble.

    Amazon takes the opposite approach. They give you all the tools to do everything yourself. But in a crunch it can be great to have that service available to help troubleshoot and diagnose a problem. Although they’re now offering support contracts, it’s not how they started out.

    If you have a crack operations team at your disposal, or you hire a third party provider like Heavyweight Internet Group Amazon Web Services gives you the flexibility and power to build phenomenal and scalable architectures. But if you’re a very small team without tons of technical know-how, you may well do better with a service-oriented provider like Rackspace et al.

A few more considerations…

  • Will your cloud provider go out of business?
  • Could a Subpoena against your provider draw you into the net?
  • Since you don’t know where your sensitive data is, should you consider encryption?
  • Should I keep additional backups outside of the cloud?
  • Should I use multiple cloud providers?
  • Should I be concerned about the lack of perimeter security?

A History lesson for Cloud Detractors

Computing history

We’ve all seen cloud computing discussed ad nauseam on blogs, on Twitter, Quora, Stack Exchange, your mom’s Facebook page… you get the idea. The tech bloggers and performance experts often pipe in with their graphs and statistics showing clearly that dollar-for-dollar, cloud hosted virtual servers can’t compete with physical servers in performance, so why is everyone pushing them? It’s just foolhardy, they say.

On the other end, management and their bean counters would simply roll their eyes saying this is why the tech guys aren’t running the business.

Seriously, why the disconnect? Open source has always involved a lot of bushwacking…

Continue reading

Seattle Web Tech Meetup Nov 21

I’ll be one of two speakers at the next Seattle Web Technology Bi-Weekly Meet up on Nov 21 at the Citrus Lounge.

They’ve sexed it up a little by calling it a face-off between Windows Azure and Amazon EC2  (no prizes for guessing which side I represent) but really it’s going to be a primer on the Platform-as-a service and Infrastructure-as-a-service models. I expect some lively discussions during Q&A.

I’ll be covering questions such as what cloud computing is, what EC2 provides, what is datacenter automation and the differences between a standard datacenter liks Rackspace and Amazon EC2. Meanwhile you folks who’ve  large investments in say EXCHANGE servers will be able to pose questions to Marcus Wendt of Composite C1.

It’s Amex sponsored and you’ll get a ticket good for a beer or a Citrus signature drink with which you can get cozy and warm up by the fireplace while Marcus and I are beamed through a flat screen with our respective presentations. If you’re in Seattle drop in. I hope to see you or at least, hear you there.

$1000 per hour Servers, Anyone?

Amazon’s spot market for computing power is set up as an open market for surplus servers. The price is dynamic and depends on demand. So when demand is low, you can get computing instances for rock bottom prices. When you do that you normally set a range of prices you’re willing to pay. If it goes over your top end, your instances get killed and re-provisioned for someone else. Obviously this wouldn’t work for all applications, like a website that has to be up all the time, but for computing power, say to run some huge hedge fund analytics, it might fit perfectly. Continue reading

Oracle Announces Paid MySQL Add-ons

 Oracle starts charging for MySQL Add-ons

Exciting news, Oracle just announced commercial MySQL extensions that they’ll be offering paid extensions to the core MySQL free product.

To be sure, this has raised waves of concern among the community, but on the whole I suspect it will be a good thing for MySQL.  This brings more commercial addons to the table, which only increases the options for customers.  Many will continue to use the core database product only, and avoid license hassles while others will surely embark on a hybrid approach if it solves their everyday business problems. Continue reading

5 Scalability Pitfalls to Avoid

1. Object Relational Mappers

Software development has always made use of libraries, off-the-shelf components that are shared between different projects.  These allow you to stand on the shoulders of others and build bigger things.  Frameworks do the same thing, they provide a context from which to build on.  Ruby on Rails for example provides a great starting framework from which to build web applications, managing sessions in an elegant way. Continue reading

4 Considerations Migrating to The Cloud

When migrating to the cloud consider security and resource variability, the cultural shift for operations and the new cost model. Continue reading