Category Archives: Book Review

What Wouldn't Google Do?

What Would Google DoIn his latest book, What Would Google Do? Jeff Jarvis seems to have authored a gushing tribute to the search giant that has pledged to do no evil. He paints a very optimistic picture, and shows us over and over how Google has opened up industries, and how that same openness helps consumers like you and I.

Jarvis, if you don’t know him by name, has been a journalist for some time, but gained particular cred and notoriety when he blogged with the headline “Dell lies. Dell Sucks” after his horrible experiences with Dell computers and customer service.

While digging through Googly chapters, on Real Estate, Publishing, Entertainment, Shopping, Education and even Airlines, Jarvis serves up anecdotes on how a more open approach can help these industries adapt to a new business environment brought about by the Internet. He cites interesting examples like Gary Vaynerchuk, the creator of the hilarious and insanely popular winelibrary.tv show about wines, and now a public speaker on social media and brand building; and Brazilian author Paulo Coelho pirating his own works.

Taking the cue from some of these successes Jarvis goes on to propagate the idea that sharing and dishing out services for free is the way to make money. The irony that you have to buy his book for him to tell you that deserves a chuckle, and also raises the question of whether he himself buys all of that (pun inevitable). Indeed openness is great for consumers as most of us would agree. A level playing field increases competition, drives down prices for consumers. But it also drives down profits and margins. Continue reading What Wouldn't Google Do?

Scalability Rules for managers and startups

Scalability RulesAbbott and Fisher’s previous book, The Art of Scalability received good reviews for shifting the way we think about scalability from merely splitting databases and adding servers, to include the human factors that weigh heavily on its success. Together with the authors’ distinguished pedigree (PayPal, Amazon, and eBay between them), I picked up a copy of their second book, Scalability Rules – 50 Principles for Scaling Web Sites without a second thought.

If Art was about laying a strong foundation for a scalable organization then Rules is the reference point for when you actually tackle the growth challenges. It acts as a reminder when you come to a crossroad of decision-taking, to keep with the principles of scaling. Each guiding principle is clearly explained and illustrated with examples. It also prescribes how and when to apply the rules. Continue reading Scalability Rules for managers and startups

Review: Here Comes Everybody by Clay Shirky

Here Comes EverybodyClay Shirky tells a great story. Here Comes Everybody begins with a case of a lost phone in a taxi cab, and the extraordinary turn of events that led to the owner retrieving it. From photos posted online, to NYPD who were uninterested in following up, to taking it all online. Through that online publicity, the story got picked up by the NY Times and CNN, which put pressure on the police to track down the taxi.  It’s a great example that illustrates the nuances, both good and bad, powerful and persistent that the Internet can unleash.

Throughout the book he weaves stories about the network effect, friends and friends of friends, and how that impacts information, organization, and the spread of ideas. Citing examples such as the SCO vs Linux court case and Groklaw, flash mobs and political organization, Shirky notes how all these events were influenced and facilitated by the Internet. Continue reading Review: Here Comes Everybody by Clay Shirky

Book review – Trust Agents by Chris Brogan & Julien Smith

Trust Agents Stumbling onto 800-CEO-Read, and their top books feature, I found Brogan and Smith’s work.  Brogan’s blog intrigued me enough so I walked down to the Strand here in NYC to pick up a copy.

What I found was an excellent introduction to the nebulous world of social media marketing, where you find all sorts of advice and suggestions on how to engage your target audience.  If you’re feeling like an ignoramus on matters of social media, Trust Agents is a great place to start and will give you ideas of how to ‘humanize’ your digital connections.

The authors illustrate the Trust Agent idea with Comcast Cares for example and how they engaged customers, and what worked so well for them.  Or Gary Vaynerchuk and his game changing Wine Library TV about wine.  He also emphasizes that building relationships online is a lot like building relationships in the real world a la Keith Ferrazzi of Never Eat Alone fame.  Engage in meaningful ways with people, don’t market to them. Share valuable tidbits, and the community will reward you tenfold.

A ‘trust agent’  lives by six principles:

  1. Make your own game – be willing to take risks and break from the crowd
  2. Be ‘One of Us’ – be part of the community by doing your bit and contributing to it
  3. The Archimedes Effect – leverage your own strengths wisely
  4. Agent Zero – position yourself at the center by connecting people and groups
  5. Human Artist – learn how to work with people; help others and be conscientious of etiquette
  6. Build an Army – you need allies to help spread your ideas

The book is excellent.  Put it on your holiday list.

Book Review – Effective MySQL

Effective MySQL: Optimizing SQL Statements

by Ronald Bradford

No Nonsense, Readable, Practical, and Compact

Effective MySQLI like that this book is small; 150 pages means you can carry it easily.  It’s also very no nonsense.  It does not dig too deeply into theory unless it directly relates to your day-to-day needs.  And those needs probably cluster heavily around optimizing SQL queries, as those pesky developers are always breaking things 😉

Jokes aside, this new book out on Oracle Press is a very readable volume. Bradford has drawn directly from real-world experience to give you the right bite size morsels you need in your day-to-day MySQL activities. Continue reading Book Review – Effective MySQL

Book Review – The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

The Lean Startup coverWhat do you do after founding not one, but two companies and watching them fail miserably all by the time you were barely out of college?

Move to the Valley, make shrewd investments in other startups and become insanely rich like Sean Parker? A Bit lofty perhaps. How about try, try again and succeed. Then reinvent yourself as a guru dishing out startup wisdom through your blog and publishing a book that ends up the top of the New York Times Bestseller’s list. That’s essentially what Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup did.

True entrepreneurs fail many times before they succeed and continuously find opportunities to reinvent themselves. Ries is one of them. He’s taken all that he’s learned from his failures, and later successes, from his college years in the 1990s right through the dotcom crash, and packaged them into a guide for startups to consult in their quest for world domination.  Continue reading Book Review – The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

Book Review – Help! by Oliver Burkeman

Help! by Oliver Burkeman

Help! How To Become Slightly Happier and Get a Bit More Done

I’ve long overcome that sheepish feeling when browsing the Self-help section at the bookstore. Sure, How to Make Friends and Influence People or the Seven Steps to World Domination in your bookcase aren’t exactly the sort of titles to suggest a deep intellect but I like to keep an open mind when checking out the latest hardcover secret to happiness and prosperity. Basically I try not to diss a book just because it’s got “soup” on the cover.

I will concede that publishers have gone a bit overboard with churning out the number of self-help titles in the last 20 years or so. As with anything that proliferates you’re stuck with having to wade through the swamp of well, BS. HELP! How to Become Slightly Happier and Get a Bit More Done by Oliver Burkeman is ideal for those curious enough about self-improvement but too cool to buy into mind-body-soul mantras.

Continue reading Book Review – Help! by Oliver Burkeman

Review – Who Moved My Cheese

whomovedmycheese

Spencer Johnson is a great writer.  His business book classic was a real page turner.  He takes a page from the REWORK book and that’s a good thing.

Who Moved My Cheese is a story about mice living in a maze happy and content that they have an unlimited supply of cheese.  Then one day the cheese runs out.  Continue reading Review – Who Moved My Cheese

Book Review – Rework

rework coverRework is chock full of ideas

Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson’s new book REWORK is one of the best startup business books I’ve read since Alan Weiss’ Million Dollar Consulting. If you’re already a fan of their signal vs noise blog, you’d be familiar with their terse style. Sharp and to the point.

Which is why you can pick it up and read it in a few hours.  You’ll want to because it’s well written and pared down to essentials.  In fact the book reads like their workflow advice, less mass, do it yourself, cut out the fat, concentrate on essentials.  As such they are clearly practicing what they preach, which I like. Continue reading Book Review – Rework

Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith

In search of a good book on Chef itself, I picked up this new title on O’Reilly.  It’s one of their new format books, small in size, only 75 pages.

There was some very good material in this book.  Mr. Nelson-Smith’s writing style is good, readable, and informative.  The discussion of risks of infrastructure as code was instructive.  With the advent of APIs to build out virtual data centers, the idea of automating every aspect of systems administration, and building infrastructure itself as code is a new one.  So an honest discussion of the risks of such an approach is bold and much needed.  I also liked the introduction to Chef itself, and the discussion of installation.

Chef isn’t really the main focus of this book, unfortunately.  The book spends a lot of time introducing us to Agile Development, and specifically test driven development.  While these are lofty goals, and the first time I’ve seen treatment of the topic in relation to provisioning cloud infrastructure, I did feel too much time was spent on that.  Continue reading Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith