Category Archives: All

Today’s startups: assemble at your own risk

devops divide

I was talking with Todd Hoff recently over at High Scalability about a trend I’ve seen of late.

ME: I really liked this post by Zoli Kahan from Clay.io.  AWS, cloudflare, docker, haproxy, mysql, mongo, memcache, ansible.  They use just about every technology being talked about these days.  

Todd: Yah, that’s why I asked to republish it. I thought it was a good updated sampler stack.

ME: That said I defy you to find a team that actually *KNOWS* all those technologies.  

Todd: Agreed. Systems are a lot of assembly these days, which doesn’t mean we know how to build the parts being assembled.

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The article I was referring to was: How Clay.io Built their 10x Arch Using AWS, Docker, HAProx & Lots More

1. Dizzying array of technologies in use

I’ve been working with startups since the mid-nineties. In those days most application stacks consisted of a PHP application running on Apache, with Oracle on the backend. Both webserver & db ran on Sun Solaris. Hardware was reliable. Most attention was focused on fitting everything in memory, and monitoring the servers for swapping, and disk failure. Boy have those days changed.

I see dozens of startups each year, so I see a lot of very cutting edge environments. Here’s a peak at what I’m seeing these days:

Database: MySQL, Postgres & Oracle, to Mongodb, Cassandra & Couchbase

Caching: Memcache or Redis

Search: Solr

Webservers: Apache, Nginx, Lighttpd

Load balancers: haproxy, Zen

Languages: PHP, Python & Ruby

Publishing: Drupal, WordPress, Joomla

Continuous Integration: Jenkins

Metrics: Cacti, collectd, NewRelic

Monitoring: Nagios, Ganglia, Munin, OpenNMS

Automation: Ancible, Chef, Puppet, Docker & Vagrant

Logs: Logstash

DDOS & CDN: Cloudflare, Ultradns

Whew… That’s a long list!! And we’re not even considering the API’s that many applications are now building on.

Also: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

2. Shortcuts abound

Startups early on, don’t have enough working capital to hire a huge engineering team. So that means everyone is stretched. With a list of technologies that is ever growing, something’s gotta give.

These may cut corners by handing the web & technical operations work to a developer who has some skills. But I continue to ask… Does a four-letter word divide dev & ops?

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

3. More things to break & master

Ownership of a software stack, such as a database means mastery of…

o features in current versions
o bugs of current versions
o vulnerabilities of various versions
o troubleshooting
o best practices
o backup & reliability

For example a lot of shops where I dig into the database, I find low hanging fruit, such as misconfigured startup settings, table layout or index usage.

I see similar things when a networking expert pours over the haproxy configuration, or runs ping tests across the network. Most of these components are setup with fairly vanilla configurations, leaving loose ends and frayed threads.

Check out: Why I can’t raise the bar at every firm

4. Many startups carrying technical debt

I’ve seen a growing reliance on ORM’s which is worrying. Build your foundation on a crutch, and it gets very hard to eliminate down the line. Here are Ward Cunningham’s warnings on technical debt.

Related: Are SQL Databases Dead?

5. Long term support & viability

At one five year old firm, I was brought in to address scalability problems. I met with the team and was asked to provide a comprehensive review. The first thing I found was all the original engineers had long since left, so the code was new for everyone. As I dug my heels in, I found multiple versions of Apache along with Nginx on some other servers. Their stack was built on a patchwork of Python, Ruby & PHP. Then digging in further, we found a complicated web of dependencies for digital assets, mounted across servers & unmonitored.

Lack of standards is common in environments like these. Without an operational or architectural lead, developers are left to make decisions with what is directly in front of them. Though a decision of what language to use may appear simple at the outset, it carries long term consequences.

Will that language or technology be supported in five years? Will the community survive? Will your firm be able to hire people with that skill set? Will engineers still be excited about it?

See also: Is high availability overrated? Is five nines a myth?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

5 things I learned from Gif Constable about Talking to Humans

talking to humans

I was just scanning through AVC.com, Fred Wilson’s popular blog, and hit on a post about great reading material. In it was mentioned a free e-book by Gif Constable called Talking to Humans.

Gif developed the Lean Launchpad curriculum, taught at Stanford, UC Berkeley, Columbia, UCSF, NYU & now hundreds of other universities worldwide.

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One of the main takeaways from that work is the idea of “getting out of the building”. It means essentially that before you get to far along with your idea, building your product, and too heavily vested and invested in one direction, go do real research with real potential customers.

Right from the beginning test your ideas, and talk to customers. It’s not easy, but if done right will be very revealing.

The book can be had for free at Talking To Humans as an e-book, or send it straight to your kindle for $0.99 cents! With a forward by Steve Blank & Tom Fishburne’s funny cartoons and at only 98 pages, it’s well worth an hour or two of your time.

More details on Gif’s blog.

1. How to be a detective

Getting out of the building and talking to people is hard. It’s messy. It’s going into the real world where customers may not understand or care about your product.

But that’s also exactly why you want to talk to people. You’ll get real raw perspectives.

Also be wary of talking to friends & family. They may have biases, and want to tell you what you want to hear.

While interviewing, beware of speculation in your own ideas and what your interview subjects are telling you. Ask for stories instead and tease out real behavior.

Read this: When clients don’t pay

2. Fight cognitive biases with metrics

We all have biases. We think are customers are soccer moms, or 20-somethings who like lattes. By calculating metrics, we find out which market segments actually want our product and why. Keep calculating metrics, and make conclusions from real data.

At the same time beware the dynamic of mistaking statistics for facts. Remain skeptical!

Check out: 5 ways startups misstep on scalability

GIFF CONSTABLE 03-SD from The GovLab on Vimeo.

3. Map out your business

There are a few models mentioned in the book for mapping your business. Choose your favorite:

Alexander Osterwalder’s business model canvas

Ash Maurya’s lean canvas

Also: Are SQL Databases Dead?

4. How a startup can fail

Startups can fail in a myriad of different ways. This business is not for the weary or faint of heart! Here are some of the land mines in the road ahead.

o wrong customer or market
o wrong revenue model
o wrong cost structure
o wrong customer acquisition
o wrong product
o wrong team
o wrong timing

Related: Will Oracle kill MySQL?

5. How to screw up customer discovery

Interviewing real customers in the field requires a lot of balance. Here are a few things you should avoid:

o let speculation equal confirmation
o lead the witness to your conclusion
o talk over them
o selective hearing
o weigh one conversation heavily
o let fear of rejection win
o talking to anyone
o be unprepared for the interview
o try to learn everything at once
o only do customer dev first week
o ask customer to design the product

See also: How can Vagrant be used to deploy on Amazon EC2

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5 Things I just learned from James Turnbull about Docker

docker containers

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I just got my hands on a copy of James Turnbull’s new book The Docker Book. It’s an excellent introduction to Linux containers & the powerful things you can do with them. It’s 335 pages covering all the introductory topics to get you up and running and then more advanced topics like working with the docker API, building services & extending docker.

Here’s what I learned…

1. Containers aren’t new

The technology today we call containers in Unix is based on chroot mechanism which was introduced way back in the 80′s.

With traditional virtualization, we use a hypervisor layer, so we emulate hardware. The virtual machine running on top, can run anything, from Windows, to different flavors & versions of unix. It appears to be a completely separate piece of hardware.

With containers we move up to the operating system level, and we create isolation between users. These users all share the same parent operating system. This means it requires dramatically less overhead. That means speed!

Docker is an automation layer built on Lightweight Linux Containers or LXC. To applications it looks like they have their own machine, their own userspace, their own filesystem, their own network.

Also: Is Apple betting against big data?

2. No more VirtualBoxes

Are you tired of waiting for your VMs to spinup? Building dev & test environments becomes lightening fast with Docker. This accelerates software development, and makes a lot of things easier.

Also: When prospects mislead

3. Images, registries & containers

Images share some of the properties of images in hypervisor virtualization. However they are implemented with union file systems. While VirtualBox images take some time to boot, as the entire filesystem must be read & code executed anew, docker images are more like source code to the LXC subsystem.

Registries store your public and private images. The Docker Hub is one popular one. You can also host & deploy your own docker registry as your needs dictate.

Like VMs, containers can be started & stopped at will, albeit at lightening fast speed. They can also be deleted much as a VM can be.

Also: What can new york fashion week teach Chad Dickerson about Net Neutrality?

4. Lightning fast sandboxes

As we mentioned containers are fast. Did we mention really fast?

This can facilitate unit testing & continuous integration. A lot of shops are starting to use Jenkins for continuous integration, and fast testing is key to this process.

Also: Is automation killing old-school technical operations?

5. They work with Vagrant

Are you already using Vagrant to automate deployment of virtual environments. If so the transition is easy. Here Docker becomes your provisioner.

Mark Stratmann put together a great how to, Implementing a Vagrant / Docker Dev environment which we’d recommend you take a look at. You can also head over to the Vagrant docs themselves.

Also: Which tech do startups use most?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is Apple betting against big data?

apple_android

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1. Pushing privacy

Apple has been pushing it’s privacy policy of late, in much of it’s marketing around the new iOS 8 and iPhone 6.

In particular Tim Cook takes direct aim at Google’s collection of user data:

“A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product. But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy.”

Read: Is Fred Wilson wrong about Apple?

2. Weak in cloud

It’s been quoted in various news that Apple is rather “weak” in the cloud. But digging a little deeper, this appears to be a deliberate strategy, a bet against using customer data in ways those end users may grow to resent.

Also: Is the Android ecosystem still broken?

3. The bet against open worked

Recall that Apple has had a fairly closed ecosystem since the beginning. This has kept their AppStore much cleaner, and free of malware. Reference the terrible problems that still plague the Android Play Store, from lack of policing.

Open also works as an iron fist on UI & UX, enforcing a consistency across apps and developers. This is a clear win for consumers and end users, even if they don’t understand the hows, whys and wherefores.

Related: No iPhones were harmed in the creation of this outage

4. Don’t monetize what you store in iCloud

Apple doesn’t directly monetize what is stored in iCloud. That means there’s no business imperative to make *use* of your data. They’re just storing it. This means they can also push encryption, a win for consumers, as it doesn’t bump heads with their business in any way.

Check this: What is mobile scalability & why is it important?

5. iAd has real privacy limits

Apple does have a platform called iAd. But even that has in-built limitations.

“iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.”

It’s unclear if all of these moves will help Apple in the marketplace. It remains to be seen if consumers will choose technology based on privacy concerns and fears.

Read this: How to increase newsletter signups with nifty iphone trick

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When prospects mislead

MUHAMMAD ALI ROCKS GEORGE FOREMAN ON THE JAW

While a story is fresh in ones mind, it’s a great time to tell it. And so I set out to putting pen to paper about a recent consulting war story.

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A financial services firm reached out to me, asking about services. We discussed the project plan, and the day after the call I sent along a quote. I suggested three options, a weekly fee, a monthly one, or monthly with advance payment.

They decided to go with option C, and we arranged a kickoff meeting.

1. Level setting on trust

I’ve done this kind of work for so long, and worked with so many clients over the years, that it sometimes becomes second nature. I arrived, and we chatted amicably. I asked him about his wikipedia page, which he seemed excited to talk about.

I was surprised that there wasn’t a check ready, as we had decided on advanced payment in full, but didn’t make a mention right away. He then tried to dial in his partner, but that just went to voicemail. So we continued the meeting without him.

I don’t know how important the meeting was to both team members, but they were both on the invite & emails. His partner never called back through the meeting either.

Read this: When migrating from Oracle to MySQL Prepare to Bushwack

2. Negotiations is part art & dance

Interestingly I had met up with some colleagues the night before over italian food. I mentioned I was meeting a new prospect the next day, but had reservations about whether they had really decided to hire me, or were just still prospecting.

So during the meeting I was somewhat conscious of that question. Are we already in exploratory, discovery mode? Has the project even begun? That’s a question, and from what I sensed it was still an open one.

As the meeting wore on, questions about oracle licenses, versions, and EC2 configurations came up. Furious note taking continues.

Related: Which tech do startups use most?

3. Time & mismanagement

One thing that comes up for me in these situations is questions of time management. In order to work with a new client, I must clear my schedule, and make time available. That has a value to start with. When it turns out a project isn’t actually ready yet, it becomes an awkward stumble out of the gates.

Also: Is automation killing the sysadmin job role?

4. Can you research this one thing

As I raised various concerns about Oracle, the data loader portion, and unknowns around how that software worked, the prospect asked if I could do a little research for them.

This is where things started to crack. Rather than answer the question, I made a more aggressive nod to the question on my mind: Have we really started on this project yet? I explained that I was confused, and gathered from our email this this was a kickoff meeting. The tension in the air rose noticeably.

He then explained “Well we’re still waiting to hear back from a vendor about XYZ”. From there I began to gather up my things.

Check this: What can fashion week teach Chad Dickerson about Net Neutrality?

5. Watch out for those Rothkos

As I stand up I comment on the digs. “Is this shared office space, those look like Rothkos?” I ask. “Nope this is all ours, my wife is a collector & art dealer. We have some real Warhol’s too”. “Wow…”, I respond, “tough business to be in!”. With that he says “Well it is very volatile, we can be out of business in a month.”

My take away here isn’t to be wary of all new prospects. Each person or business has their own *style* of doing business. Rather, until you’ve established trust with a new client, consider that you may not yet be working on the project at all.

And with that the dance continues. While you may wish to demonstrate and illustrate your knowledge, and the solutions you’d recommend, beware of solving the problem before you’re even hired!

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

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What can NYFW teach Chad Dickerson about net neutrality?

net neutrality

Here we are again discussing Net Neutrality… Chad Dickerson CEO of well renowned Etsy.com, has come out strongly in favor, and wants everyone to take action.

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Honestly when I read his wired piece Etsy CEO to businesses: If Net Neutrality Perishes, We Will Too, I was struck by one statement:

The FCC proposal will threaten *ANY* business that uses the internet to reach it’s customers.

Any business? Quite a sweeping statement. Strikes fear into me that’s for sure… And if you read through the comments, the debate is equally fierce. One side says net neutrality is socialism! The other side says anyone against net neutrality is a shill for Comcast or Verizon! Battle lines drawn!

1. Are all businesses at risk?

Isn’t the idea that ETSY will perish overstated? Are they a high bandwidth company? Are they trying to stream video?
Is the entire Etsy community alarmed? Isn’t that a rather broad statement?

To be sure ending net neutrality will impact some businesses. Perhaps one reason VC’s like Fred Wilson are so concerned about Net Neutrality isn’t for the freedom of millions of internet users, but the threat to disruptive businesses, the startups that VC’s directly invest in.

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

2. Will all internet users be impacted?

Here again some of this debate seems overstated. I remember using the internet on a dialup modem. 300 baud, was about the speed at which you can type. Then along came 14.4, 28k and upward speeds climbed. All the while the internet was usable. Could I do all the things I can today, nope.

Even if these horrible Comcast’s & Verizon’s reduce speeds by 100 times, they will still be plenty fast for most internet users. Sure streaming video would be impacted, and yes streaming music would be impacted. But for end users, I would argue most would not be impacted. It is rather the disruptive startups & businesses that would be most impacted.

Also: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Are there anti-EDU parallels

In the mid-nineties, before the dot-com bubble, there was a huge raging debate about even having commercial entities on the internet at all. Enlightened internet cognoscenti considered it an abomination.

But the real world pushed it’s nose in, and today we take as a given.

Check this: Is Hunter Walk right about operations & startups?

4. Is google right about millisecond delays?

“Research from Google & Microsoft shows that delays of milliseconds result in fewer page views and fewer sales in both the short & long term”. Yep, that’s a fact. The research shows this. But what do we take away from that?

As a performance and scalability consultant I see a *TON* of websites that have huge delays, well over tiny millisecond ones that Google frets over. Internet startups struggle with performance every day.

What’s the irony? Slowdowns that Comcast or Verizon might introduce to end users pale in comparison with these larger systemic problems.

Also: 5 Ways startups misstep on scalability

5. Any lessons from sites of New York Fashion Week?

I like the Pingdom speed test tool. I used it to track the speed of some of the websites & blogs that are big for NYFW. Here’s what I found:

nyfw speed test results

What do you see? Take a look at the SIZE column. Notice something strange? The LARGEST sites, in terms of images, css & assets aren’t necessarily the SLOWEST! That’s a funny result if you consider net neutrality. If you think the network speed is the same for all websites, shouldn’t the smallest pages load fastest?

Not true at all. It’s a very simplistic way of viewing things. Fashionista.com for example is doing a ton of tuning behind the scenes. As you can see it is making their site far and away the fastest! Network bandwidth and net neutrality be damned!

Related: Are SQL Databases Dead?

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Is automation killing old-school operations?

puppet logo

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I was shocked to find this article on ReadWrite: The Truth About DevOps: IT Isn’t Dead; It’s not even Dying. Wait a second, do people really think this?

Truth is I have heard whispers of this before. I was at a meetup recently where the speaker claimed “With more automation you can eliminate ops. You can then spend more on devs”. To an audience of mostly developers & startup founders, I can imagine the appeal.

1. Does less ops mean more devs?

If you’re listening to a platform service sales person or a developer who needs more resources to get his or her job done, no one would be surprised to hear this. If we can automate away managing the stack, we’ll be able to clear the way for the real work that needs to be done!

This is a very seductive perspective. But it may be akin to taking on technical debt, ignoring the complexity of operations and the perspective that can inform a longer view.

chef logo

Puppet Labs’ Luke Kanies says “Become uniquely valuable. Become great at something the market finds useful.”. I couldn’t agree more.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

2. What happens when developers leave?

I would argue that ops have a longer view of product lifecycle. I for one have been brought in to many projects after the first round of developers have left, and teams are trying to support that software five years after the first version was built.

That sort of long term view, of how to refresh performance, and revitalize code is a unique one. It isn’t the “building the future” mindset, the sexy products, and disruptive first mover “we’re changing the world” mentality.

It’s a more stodgy & conservative one. The mindset is of reliability, simplicity, and long term support.

Also: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

3. What’s your mandate?

From what I’ve seen, devs & ops are divided by a four letter word.

That word I believe is “risk”. Devs have a mandate from the business to build features & directly answer to customer requests today. Ops have a mandate to reliability, working against change and thinking in terms of making all that change manageable.

Different mandates mean different perspectives.

Related: What is Devops & why is it important?

4. Can infrastructure live as code?

Puppet along with infrastructure automation & configuration management tools like Chef offer the promise of fully automated infrastructure. But the truth is much much more complex. As typical technology stacks expand from load balancer, webserver & database, to multiple databases, caching server, search server, puppet masters, package repositories, monitoring & metrics collection & jump boxes we’re all reaching a saturation point.

Yes automation helps with that saturation, but ultimately you need people with those wide ranging skills, to manage the complex web of dependencies when things fail.

And fail they will.

Check out: Why are MySQL DBA’s and ops so hard to find?

5. ORM’s and architecture

If you aren’t familiar, ORM’s are a rather dry sounding name for a component that is regularly overlooked. It’s a middleware sitting between application & database, and they drastically simplify developers lives. It helps them write better code and get on with the work of delivering to the business. It’s no wonder they are popular.

But as Ward Cunningham elloquently explains, they are surely technical debt that eventually must get paid. Indeed.

There is broad agreement among professional DBA’s. Each query should be written, each one tuned, and each one deployed. Just like any other bit of code. Handing that process to a library is doomed to failure. Yet ORM’s are still evolving, and the dream still lives on.

And all that because devs & ops have a completely different perspective. We need both of them to run modern internet applications. Lets not forget folks. :)

Read this: Do managers and CTO’s underestimate operational costs?

Want more? Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Do we need another book on communicating?

supercommunicator

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I had to ask the question. There are so many books on communicating & presenting affectively, it begs the question, what can this book do that others haven’t?

While it’s a fair question, I don’t necessarily think it stands with peers. That said it’s a new book, with a new tone, preaching many of the best advice and doing it with a flair. If you’ve read a ton of communication books, you may not find something new, but if the topic is one you’re just digging into, Pietrucha is a great place to start.

1. Jobs vs Gates – inspired presentations

If you’ve ever seen these two companies CEO’s do new product demos, you’ll immediately get it. You don’t have to be an apple fanboy to appreciate how Jobs presents without buzzwords, and cuts to the heart of our hearts.

That means don’t get mired in jargon, speak to our passions, and be your own ambassador.

Also: Do managers underestimate operational costs?

2. Lead with a story & a question

In a recent discussion with a prospect I was asked about one experience that stood out over the years of consulting.

One popped into my head of a dot-com startup in the late 90′s. The company was trying to close an acquisition deal, but the web application was sick & feverish. My first few days involved conversations with lead engineers, DBA & operations team members. As I turn over more stones, I found a key component, the database, misconfigured. I sifted through configurations, and found the setup lacking. The server was using only 5% of memory. Some of the settings were even still at their default. Changing the right ones allowed the machine to flex it’s muscles like a marathon runner taken off a starvation diet. Things improved very quickly, and the site returned to a snappy responsive self.

The CEO beamed with approval, and just a few weeks later the firm was purchased for over 80 million dollars. Not bad work if you can get it. :)

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

3. Drop the vernacular & speak broadly

After recently doing some writing for muckrack on how to reach pitch journalists and then at Infoworld getting started with Amazon EC2. I’ve learned a ton. Having a professional editor explain what they want really puts things in perspective.

Editors will start by talking about their audience. If you’re a blogger, do you know who your audience is, and what they really get from your site? There may be many answers. Once you get your audience, how can you speak to all of them? In my case, I have readers who are programmers & devops, then I have CEO’s & VCs. But it doesn’t stop there. What about recruiters, and hiring managers? How about random internet searchers, and students?

All of these folks can get something from my site, and using broad language allows everyone to be within reach. Don’t sacrifice depth, but use language and stories to make your point.

Check this: 5 ways startups misstep on scalability

4. Analogies that resonate

I attend a lot of mini conferences, meetups, drinkups & social events in nyc. I find it’s one of the keys to success in consulting.

In an endless sea of conversations, you will find yourself talking about what your day-to-day business is all about. In my early years in nyc, these conversations would consist of technically correct descriptions, followed by glazed eyes, and a quick change of subject. After this happens often enough you start to wonder, how can I share such a technical description to a broader audience?

Truth is it’s only technical because you know so much about it. If I stand back I might say I’m “a sort of specialized surgeon for the internet”, or “a traffic cop of sorts, for the information highway we all share”, or better yet “a plumber, that you call when your pipes are backed up and your customers are screaming”.

Whichever analogy I use, I see eyes light up, and a look of understanding. “Oh I can see how that would be an important specialization”. Indeed.

The right analogy makes all the difference!

Related: Are startup CEO’s hiding their scalability problems?

5. Put your words on the chopping block

If you haven’t already done so, start chopping. Sentences & paragraphs all benefit from shortening & edit. Distill your big ideas in summary and let the story lend the detail. Your audience will pay closer attention, and see the big picture you are trying to share.

The guys at 37 signals do this eloquently in RE:Work .

Read this: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Which tech do startups use most?

MySQL on Amazon Cloud AWS

Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures publishes an excellent blog called Coding VC. There you can find some excellent posts, such as pitches by analogy, and an algorithm for seed round valuations and analyzing product hunt data.

He recently wrote a blog post about a topic near and dear to my heart, Which Technologies do Startups Use. It’s worth a look.

One thing to keep in mind looking over the data, is that these are AngelList startups. So that’s not a cross section of all startups, nor does it cover more mature companies either.

In my experience startups can get it right by starting fresh, evaluating the spectrum of new technologies out there, balancing sheer solution power with a bit of prudence and long term thinking.

I like to ask these questions:

o Which technologies are fast & high performance?
o Which technologies have a big, vibrant & robust community?
o Which technologies can I find plenty of engineers to support?
o Which technologies have low operational overhead?
o Which technologies have low development overhead?

1. Database: MySQL

MySQL holds a slight lead according to the AngelList data. In my experience its not overly complex to setup and there are some experienced DBAs out there. That said database expertise can still be hard to find .

We hear a lot about MongoDB these days, and it is surely growing in popularity. Although it doesn’t support joins and arbitrary slicing and dicing of data, it is a very powerful database engine. If your application needs more straightforward data access, it can bring you amazing speed improvements.

Postgres is a close third. It’s a very sophisticated database engine. Although it may have a smaller community than MySQL, overall it’s a more full featured database. I’d have no reservations recommending it.

Also: Top MySQL DBA Interview questions

2. Hosting: Amazon

Amazon Web Services is obviously the giant in the room. They’re big, they’re cheap, they’re nimble. You have a lot of options for server types, they’ve fixed many of the problems around disk I/O and so forth. Although you may still experience latency around multi-tenant related problems, you’ll benefit from a truly global reach, and huge cost savings from the volume of customers they support.

Heroku is included although they’re a different type of service. In some sense their offering is one part operations team & one part automation. Yes ultimately you are getting hosting & virtualization, but some things are tied down. Amazon RDS provides some parallels here. I wrote Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?. Long term you’re likely going to switch to an AWS, Joyent or Rackspace for real scale.

I was surprised to see Azure on the list at all here, as I rarely see startups build on microsoft technologies. It may work for the desktop & office, but it’s not the right choice for the datacenter.

Read: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

3. Languages: Javascript

Javascript & Node.js are clearly very popular. They are also highly scalable.

In my experience I see a lot of PHP & of course Ruby too. Java although there is a lot out there, can tend to be a bear as a web dev language, and provide some additional complication, weight and overhead.

Related: Is Hunter Walk right about operations & startups?

4. Search: Elastic Search

I like that they broke apart search technology as a separate category. It is a key component of most web applications, and I do see a lot of Elastic Search & Solr.

That said I think this may be a bit skewed. I think by far the number one solution would be NO SPECIFIC SEARCH technology. That’s right, many times devs choose a database centric approach, like FULLTEXT or others that perform painfully bad.

If this is you, consider these search solutions. They will bring you huge performance gains.

Check this: Are SQL Databases Dead?

5. Automation: Chef

As with search above, I’d argue there is a far more prevalent trend, that is #1 to use none of these automation technologies.

Although I do think chef, docker & puppet can bring you real benefits, it’s a matter of having them in the right hands. Do you have an operations team that is comfortable with using them? When they leave in a years time, will your new devops also know the technology you’re using? Can you find a good balance between automation & manual configuration, and document accordingly?

Read: Why are database & operations experts so hard to find?

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Is Hunter Walk right about operations & startups?

The.Rohit - Flickr

The.Rohit – Flickr

Join 26,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Hunter Walk blogged recently about the importance of building great operations teams. And while he was speaking primarily about business operations, the startup technical operations teams are equally difficult to get right.

1. performance & scalability

As your grows like Birchbox, your customer growth curve may begin to look like a hockey stick. That’s a good problem to have. Will your web application be able to keep up with the onslaught of traffic those customers bring?

Getting performance and scalability just right, will mean fewer site crashes during those key moments when all eyes are on your site.

Also: Is top operations talent hard to find?

2. Operations is key to architecture

Developers will always have strong opinions on architecture. However they may be heavily influenced by their own mandate, features, deliverability & deadlines. So it’s no surprise that they may sometimes choose to build on ORM’s, the middleware brought to you by Hibernate, Cake PHP, Active Record & the like.

And while these technologies seem a necessity in todays modern architectures, they play havoc with your long term scalability. Strong technical operations teams mean a better vision in this area. Heading off your reliance on these technologies will mean managing technical debt before it takes down your country.

Read: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

3. Operations informs strategy

Did you build in those operational switches to turn off the heaviest code, when your site gets overloaded? Operations strategy can help you see these problems on the horizon before they overwhelm you.

Have you considered building a browse only mode for your site? If you’ve ever visited Facebook or Yelp after hours you may have been greeted with the message “We can’t save your comments. Please try again later”. A small innocuous message to end users doesn’t disrupt their enjoyment of the site terribly. But from an technical operations perspective it’s huge. It means teams can perform backups, upgrades and maintenance without interrupting day-to-day activity on the site.

Related: Is scalability a big business?

4. Operations means resilience

We only learn real disaster recovery lessons from storms like Sandy. That’s because resilience highlighted best when it is a real & urgent need.

In technical operations, getting backups right & testing your recovery plan all form key steps in your path to excellence. Get them right before you need them, and ensure repeatability.

Read: Is high availability a real possibility?

5. Operations means technical strength

At the end of the day, getting technical operations right, means you can move from strength to strength. It means building on a solid foundation the likes of Google, Facebook, Foursquare & Etsy. It means you can evolve & grow with your customers, and meet their needs confidently.

Check out: Do startup CEO’s underestimate operational costs?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters