How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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Hi, I’m currently an IT professional and I’m training for AWS Solutions Architect – Associate exam. My question is how to gain some valuable hands-on experience without quitting my well-paying consulting gig I currently have which is not cloud based. I was thinking, perhaps I could do some cloud work part time after I get certified.

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I work in the public sector and the IT contract prohibits the agency from engaging any cloud solutions until the current contract expires in 2019. But I can’t just sit there without using these new skills – I’ll lose it. And if I jump ship I’ll loose $$$ because I don’t have the cloud experience.


Hi George,

Here’s what I’d suggest:

1. Setup your AWS account

A. open aws account, secure with 2FA & create IAM roles

First things first, if you don’t already have one, go signup. Takes 5 minutes & a credit card.

From there be sure to enable two factor authentication. Then stop using your root account! Create a new IAM user with permissions to command line & API. Then use that to authenticate. You’ll be using the awscli python package.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. Automatic deployments

B. plugin a github project
C. setup CI & deployment
D. get comfy with Ansible

Got a pet project on github? If not it’s time to start one. ๐Ÿ™‚

You can also alternatively use Amazon’s own CodeCommit which is a drop-in replacement for github and works fine too. Get your code in there.

Next setup codedeploy so that you can deploy that application to your EC2 instance with one command.

But you’re not done yet. Now automate the spinup of the EC2 instance itself with Ansible. If you’re comfortable with shell scripts, or other operational tools, the learning curve should be pretty easy for you.

Read: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams? The growing demand for Cloud SRE

3. Clusters

E. play around with kubernetes or docker swarm

Both of these technologies allow you to spinup & control a fleet of containers that are running on a fixed set of EC2 instances. You may also use Amazon ECS which is a similar type of offering.

Related: How to deploy on EC2 with Vagrant

4. Version your infrastructure

F. use terraform or cloudformation to manage your aws objects
G. put your terraform code into version control
H. test rollback & roll foward infrastructure changes

Amazon provides CloudFormation as it’s foundational templating system. You can use JSON or YAML. Basically you can describe every object in your account, from IAM users, to VPCs, RDS instances to EC2, lambda code & on & on all inside of a template file written in JSON.

Terraform is a sort of cloud-agnostic version of the same thing. It’s also more feature rich & has got a huge following. All reasons to consider it.

Once you’ve got all your objects in templates, you can checkin these files into your git or CodeCommit repository. Then updating infrastructure is like updating any other pieces of code. Now you’re self-documenting, and you can roll-forward & backward if you make a mistake!

Related: How I use terraform & composer to automate wordpress on AWS

5. Learn serverless

I. get familiar with lambda & use serverless framework

Building applications & deploying only code is the newest paradigm shift happening in cloud computing. On Amazon you have Lambda, on Google you have Cloud Functions.

Related: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

6. Bonus: database skills

J. Learn RDS – MySQL, Postgres, Aurora, Oracle, SQLServer etc

For a bonus page on your resume, dig into Amazon Relational Database Service or RDS. The platform supports various databases, so try out the ones you know already first. You’ll find that there are a few surprises. I wrote Is upgrading RDS like a sh*t storm that will not end?. That was after a very frustrating weekend upgrading a customers production RDS instance. ๐Ÿ™‚

Related: Is Amazon about to disrupt your data warehouse?

7. Bonus: Data warehousing

K. Redshift, Spectrum, Glue, Quicksight etc

If you’re interested in the data side of the house, there is a *LOT* happening at AWS. From their spectrum technology which allows you to keep most of your data in S3 and still query it, to Glue which provides an ETL as a service offering.

You can also use a world-class columnar storage database called Redshift. This is purpose built for reporting & batch jobs. It’s not going to meet your transactional web-backend needs, but it will bring up those Tableau reports blazingly fast!

Related: Is Amazon about to disrupt your data warehouse?

8. Now go find that cloud deployment job!


With the above under your belt there’s plenty of work for you. There is tons of demand right now for this stuff.

Did you do learn all that? You’ve now got very very in-demand skills. The recruiters will be chomping at the bit. Update those buzzwords (I mean keywords). This will help match you with folks looking for someone just like you!

Related: Why I don’t work with recruiters

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