Always be publishing

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Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

As an advisor to New York area startups & an long time entrepreneur, I’ve found writing & publishing to be extremely valuable use of time.

I follow the motto “Always be publishing” here’s why.

1. Form your voice

According to Fred Wilson, blogging has been one of the seminal decisions contributing to his success.


“It’s like Venus Fly Paper. When I write about topics that are relevant, suddenly anybody with a startup solution in that field will approach us. This works brilliantly.”

Also: 5 Things I learned from Fred Wilson & Mark Suster

2. Get in the conversation

The world online moves quickly and it can move in surprising directions. Hype, hysteria & buzz can direct the conversation as much as facts.

Getting into the conversation allows you to weigh in. This builds your credibility. As it puts you in the line of fire, you stand up & get heard.

Related: Is blogging crucial to career building?

3. Be in the line of fire

In sales there’s a saying, “always be closing”. It means always be in front of your customers, always be on point, always be getting deals done. That’s embodying your role as a salesman.

For builders, consultants, advisors, speakers & entrepreneurs, writing puts you directly in the line of fire. You express your opinions online loud & clear. Sometimes you will find critics picking apart your ideas. Sometimes they may correct you.

This process will help you hone your ideas. Strengthen some & modify & adjust others. All of it is good.

Read: Is building traffic & pagerank possible through active blogging?

4. Share your knowledge

As an advisor, entrepeneur or professional services consultant you sell your knowledge & expertise. Why not share a bit of that with the world at large.

This is one part good samaritan, and one part testimonial of your skill & style.

Also: Is Ryan Holiday about the internet & the death of journalism?

5. Learn by doing

Back in 2001 I wrote a book called Oracle + Open Source.

Along the way, writing chapter after chapter of material, there were times when I had to brush up on material. Or write & rewrite sections. Some of it wasn’t explained well, and other material I didn’t know as well as I needed to.

Today I intersperse howtos with writing on consulting, or industry trends. Inevitably a howto like Wrestling with bears or how I tamed Tungsten Replicator involves a lot of hands-on learning.

All of this is driven by blogging & publishing.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

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