What’s the luckiest thing that’s happened in your career?

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I was browsing through Career Dean recently, a site that facilitates professionals to share knowledge & experience with more junior & recent college grads about the work world. It’s a great site. I saw the question What’s the luckiest thing that’s ever happened for your career?

I read in John Adam’s AMA his “million dollar piss” (www.careerdean.com/q/howd-you-get-the-job-twitter), which he sowed the seeds of his success basically during a piss. That’s a 1 in a million kind of story I know. I’d like to hear if anyone else has ever experienced anything remotely lucky in that way? =) something fun to come back and read if anyone answers.

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Here’s how I responded…

I moved to NYC & worked at a tiny startup in the mid-nineties. Got to do Mac stuff, windows & Sun Solaris unix as well. Jumped on an Oracle project where I was a bit underwater. The firm hired a consultant to assist me for a few days. I watched what he did and learned like a sponge. Within a few months I dove into Oracle consulting and never looked back.

I felt this was an amazingly lucky opportunity to for a few reasons.

1. DIY

I’ve been consulting for almost twenty years now. And I get asked all the time how to get into freelance or independent consulting. For me the jumping off point was working for a really small ten person startup.

An environment like this is very different from a large corporation where you do one thing. At a tiny shop, everything is very do-it-yourself. You have to be self-serve & lean. It’s a constant challenge to teach yourself what you don’t already know. It’s a very vibrant environment as you enter your career.

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2. Generalist

I also found that I had the chance to really apply everything I learned in computer science. It’s a hardware problem? It’s a software problem? These kind of silos that you experience at university don’t apply. One day you can be doing windows, mac, or Unix operating system configuration, the next you can be writing code. And on the third day you can be doing dba work.

In today’s terminology, this role was site reliability engineer or SRE, fullstack developer, tech support, evangelist, CTO, DBA, scalability & performance lead and more.

Related: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

3. Cutting edge

Startups to be sure are on the bleeding edge. They’re constrained by budgets, and through sheer will & experimentation, are cutting their teeth on the newest technologies out there.

These days that might be Cassandra & Kafka, Docker, MongoDB, hdfs, Redshift and so on.

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Ok to Fail

In larger enterprises, a lot of politics weigh on decisions, and exotic technologies are risky. When you’re at a startup, and by design you are entering uncharted waters, it’s sort of a given that it is ok to fail. This encourages learning, as there is less risk of failure.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

5. Iterative & Agile

We talk about being agile, and lean at startups. At a very small place like this, you have one or two developers, and you deploy code constantly. It’s agile by default. And that’s a good thing.

Also: Is high availability overrated? The myth of five nines.

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