Why I can’t raise the bar at every firm

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It may seem counterintuitive. If I am not the best solution provider, why on earth would I highlight it?

I believe by pointing those cases out, I also underline the clients and problems that I’m particularly well suited too, and for which I can really provide value. Read on!

1. People Problems

Sometimes, you’re hired to solve a particular problem which is framed as a technical one. Some process needs to be reworked, recoded or retooled. It’s framed as a technical problem, yet as things unfold the client already has the expertise in-house to solve & write the code. What then?

It may be that the right people aren’t communicating, project managers aren’t seeing the issues, or part of the human systems are gummed up. We can’t raise the technical bar, but we can help getting those folks talking.

I wrote about this before in When You’re Hired to Solve a People Problem.

Also: Why are oil spills & financial instability related to datacenter outages?

2. ORM Usage & Technical Debt

If you’ve read my blog you know I am not very fond of Object Relational Modelers.

I would also argue as Ward Cunningham does so elloquently that technical debt can be a real and pressing problem.

Here we would help identify and frame the problem, though the work of raising the bar technically involves the longer process of retooling & refactoring your code base.

Related: Why database choices are tricky

3. Where Commodity & Offshore Works

Some firms are already making use of odesk or offshoring resources, where you might pay as little as $150/day. If you have a very technical manager or CTO, such a solution may work well for you.

At the other end of the spectrum are the high priced senior consultants from firms like Oracle, Percona or Pythian. Yes they may set you back as much as $3500/day.

In those cases a scalability & performance review may make sense. Here’s how.. Although specialists are necessary, remember to ask yourself Why generalists are better at scaling the web.

We sit in the sweet spot between the two options. With low overhead, our prices are more affordable. At the same time you’re getting a whole lot more than a commodity solution. We’ll communicate in plain language with folks at every technical level. And for many firms that in itself is a value add.

Check this: Does Oracle Aim to Kill MySQL?

4. Existing team did their homework

Believe it or not, I’ve gone into consulting engagements where the existing team has really really done their homework.

In those cases it becomes much harder to raise the bar technically. In those cases I can help when existing team missed something. But more importantly, I can validate a correct setup, or identify technical debt.

Having an outside perspective then, can provide reassurance. As I see ten to fifteen new environments per year, I’ve seen hundreds in the past decade & a half. That’s helpful perspective in itself.

Read: Does Oracle Aim to Kill MySQL?

5. Availability & Uptime Are Already High

I wrote in depth about high availability in the Myth of Five Nines

At the end of the day, availability can only approach perfection, not actually reach it. That’s a property of complex systems. If your uptime is already extremely high, again we can validate your environment, review and provide & summarize findings. But we may not be able to raise the bar.

If that’s you, it’s a good problem to have!

Also: Why AirBNB Didn’t Have to Fail

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