Connect to MySQL in the Amazon Public Cloud

MySQL on Amazon Cloud AWS

Troubleshooting MySQL on Amazon can be a real test of patience. There are quite a few different things to watch out for in terms of connectivity & networking. Sometimes a checklist can help.

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Here’s my exhaustive list of things that can block you.

1. Be sure to create users & grants

Chances are you did something like this to create your user:


mysql> CREATE USER ‘sean’@‘localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘password’;
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON sean_schema.* TO ‘sean’@‘localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION;

But that won’t help you when connecting from a remote Amazon box. So what to do? Here’s an example:


mysql> CREATE USER ‘sean’@’10.10.%’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘password’;
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON sean_schema.* TO ‘sean’@‘%’ WITH GRANT OPTION;

You may need to make your source IP wildcard *more* aggressive. For example consider ’10.%’. You *may* even with with ‘%’ which allows *all* source IPs. This may sound dangerous, but if you use a tight security group (see item #3 below), you can still be safe.

Related: Why Oracle Won’t Kill MySQL

2. Make sure iptables is not a problem

IPTables is a Linux service that acts like a private firewall for each server. Some AMIs will have it enabled by default. If you’re having trouble like I did, this can definitely trip you up. That’s because your connection will fail silently without telling you, hey the OS won’t let me into that port!

If you are a networking pro you’ve probably already fiddled with iptables. Feel free to add specific rules, and keep it turned on. However I’d recommend just disabling it completely, and using your Amazon security groups to protect your ports.


$ /etc/init.d/iptables stop
$ chkconfig --list iptables
iptables 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off
$ chkconfig --del iptables
$ chkconfig --list iptables
service iptables supports chkconfig, but is not referenced in any runlevel (run 'chkconfig --add iptables')

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3. Test & verify amazon security group settings

Security groups in Amazon can be tricky. I recommend the following:

o create a security group webserver_group
- allow port 80 from 0.0.0.0/0
- allow port 443 from 0.0.0.0/0
- allow port 22 from

o create a security group db_group
- allow port 22 from
- allow 3306 from

What’s happening here? We can’t specify a fixed set of IP addresses because they can change in Amazon. So essentially what we’ve done is say *any* requests from servers in our Amazon package, which are in the webserver_group security group, can connect to port 3306. Pretty cool right?

This means we’re pretty locked down. No internet connections to 3306, so we can be a little looser (see item #1 above) about our grants and source IPs.

What about if you want to use your GUI tools to hit your Amazon hosted MySQL boxes? Say you like to use the Oracle Workbench, Navicat or Toad to connect to MySQL. One way you could do this is configure your db_group to allow 3306 from your office subnet. Then anyone VPN’d into your office will be able to use the tools they like.

Another option is to use Amazon VPC for your servers. You’ll setup an Amazon Virtual Private Gateway, which is a direct VPN connection between Amazon’s datacenter and your datacenter. This can be a messy process, and you’ll want to contact your network admin to help. Once it’s setup, amazon boxes appear to sit on your office or datacenter network. Cool stuff!


$ mysql -h xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx -u admin -p
Enter password:
ERROR 2003 (HY000): Can't connect to MySQL server on 'xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx'

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4. MySQL network settings

If MySQL is bound to the wrong IP address you can have real problems. First be sure skip_networking is OFF. If it is ON change it in /etc/my.cnf & restart MySQL.


mysql> show variables like 'skip_net%';
+-----------------+-------+
| Variable_name | Value |
+-----------------+-------+
| skip_networking | OFF |
+-----------------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

The other MySQL setting that can be problematic is bind-address. First check what it is set to:


$ cat /etc/my.cnf | grep bind
bind-address=127.0.0.1

This isn’t going to allow remote connections. In amazon however, your IP address may change upon reboot. So there is a special setting to allow binding to any IP:


bind-address=0.0.0.0

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5. installing mysql client & telnet for troubleshooting

You have two options for troubleshooting on the webserver side. If you’re simply trying to check by mysql command line, you may get blocked up if the network settings & security groups aren’t configured right. So use telnet first.


$ yum install -y telnet

$ telnet 10.10.10.1 3306
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
4
5.1.71??gu9Y6B'/y9Oay`QV Connection closed by foreign host.
$

If you don't get a responce, it's not an issue with users or grants, but rather that the port isn't opened. Check iptables, check bind-address and check security groups.

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6. SE Linux related issues

SE Linux will do a lot of good, if managed properly. However if you're not aware of it's existence, it can be very very frustrating. Symptoms can be as abstract as allergies, a cold or flu. It can monitor files, and prevent MySQL from being able to write where it needs to,

Read this: Migrating MySQL to Oracle

7. RPM & later centos yum repo install conflicts

I had real problems doing a custom install for a customer. They didn't want to use a repository for various settings, but preferred downloading RPMs. There were a few other customizations which were tripping things up.

Based on all the connectivity issues I was having, I backed out of the RPM based install, and then ran through a stock yum install. After doing that, I started seeing these weird errors in the mysqld.log

120328 21:32:40 [ERROR] Can't start server: Bind on TCP/IP port: Address already in use
120328 21:32:40 [ERROR] Do you already have another mysqld server running on port: 3306 ?
120328 21:32:40 [ERROR] Aborting
If I run "netstat -nat | grep 3306" in my terminal, I get the following:
tcp4 0 0 *.3306 . LISTEN

I spent hours spinning my wheels and not able to figure out what was happening here. At first it seemed a leftover pid file was the culprit. In the end it appeared the *old* /etc/init.d/mysql script was still in place, and the new yum packages wouldn't work with that.

I ended up just scrapping the whole box, and starting from scratch. Sometimes you have to do that. After a clean build, all was fine.

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