5 Reasons Devops Should Blog

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1. Stand up and be heard

Years ago I was sitting on an online forum chatting with an Oracle buddy of mine. This was circa 1998. We were working on an open source tool to interface with Oracle. There were all these libraries, for PHP & Perl, and a lot of developers starting to build tools. We hatched this hair brained idea to write a book about all of this, and pitched it to O’Reilly. They loved it and thus was born the book Oracle & Open Source in 2001.

Writing a book was, is and always will be a lot of work. It was a great learning experience too. Editors critique your writing, and this teaches you to speak to a broader audience, clarify your statements, and including illustrations and stories.

Along with this came opportunities to speak at conferences, user groups and meetups. It’s exhilerating, and professionally challenging, and I enjoyed all of it.

Blogging allows you to do all of the above in a more measured way. Write regularly, get your ideas out there, get feedback, rinse & repeat. What’s more over time you’ll build up a library of material some of which will draw solid, strong, repeat traffic. It may be what you are most passionate about, what ideas you’ve ironed out smoothly, or what material is most missing from the we already. Whatever the reason your analytics will show you the way.

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2. Share your lessons

In professional services engagements, you learn something new everyday. After a few years you’ll have some battle scars & war stories too. For example I used to have a strong distrust of sales. But through real lessons in the feast or famine world of running your own business, you learn some survival instincts. And knowing how to sell your services & expertise is an art all to itself.

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Getting up and taking a stand isn’t easy. You’ll receive criticism, and likely feel professionally vulnerable at first. But that only makes us stronger engineers, willing to listen, and better communicators.
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3. Get opinionated

Taking a stand on controversial topics, is it something you want to do? Is it something you can do confidently, but also being open to criticism, and seeing all sides.

It’s challenging, but in that process it will either open you to new ideas, or make your resolve stronger. And that process is great for your professional development.

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4. Withstand a sh*tstorm

Audiences keep you honest. If I were to go out on a limb I’d say technically brilliant, engineering audiences even more so.

I remember a post I did a year ago, which referenced a feature based on a wrong software version. In other words that feature would not work based on my article. The readers tore me to pieces in the comments.

But listen closely now, I’m saying that’s a good thing. Yes criticism is a very good thing indeed. Get enough of it, and you’ll learn to weed out the folks who are just trolls, from the ones with genuine suggestions. And all that makes you stronger!

Learn to listen a bit, and that makes you an even better sysadmin or devop.

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5. Learn by doing

Developers, ops, DBAs and Big Data jockeys alike are doers. We sit and code, build & configure components, troubleshoot & tune. Writing is descriptive and often it’s difficult for us to step back and describe what we’re doing.

By writing we carefully sift through our own thought processes to break it down for novices, or a broader audience. This is a learning process for us too. It’s therapeutic. But also it hones our message and makes us better teachers. We literally learn by doing.

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  • Louis Frolio

    Sean, great article
    and great timing, at least for me. I am in
    the process (mechanics) of getting a blog up and running with WordPress
    (Hosted). As I foray into the world of Big Data Analytics and Data
    Science I believe it will be very helpful if I document my experiences so that
    others can learn, perhaps with less pain. My first post will be a
    “how-to” on the installation of Pivotal Greenplum, RStudio, and
    MadLib libraries which turns out to be quite a bit involved. I could not find
    any one comprehensive source for this, instead I had to piece it together from
    many sources and I managed to successfully pull it off. Further, as you
    stated it will force me to be self-aware and think much more carefully about
    what I do and what I say. One of the key components of being successful
    at data science is the ability to be self-critical of your work, you need to
    always question your results. Blogging
    to the masses will certainly help me create a consistent, reliable, and
    self-critical thought processes. Tempo, tempo, temp! Hopefully I can transfer
    this tempo to my golf game :)

    Cheers, Louis.

    • http://www.iheavy.com/blog/ Sean Hull

      Thx Louis. That’s a good way to find areas in need of content. That’ll likely draw some good traffic.

      Good luck with your golf game too!