No iPhones Were Harmed in the Creation of this Outage

Apple’s recent iMessage outage had some users confused. What do you mean I can’t text my favorite cat photos?? How can Apple do this to me!?!?

What happened?

Apple provides services to everyone who uses it’s platform. iCloud for example stores your contacts, calendar, photos, apps and documents in the cloud. No more syncing to itunes to make sure all your stuff is backed up. It’s automatic in the cloud. Yes or course unless iCloud is down.

Same goes for iMessage. Apple has quietly introduced this, as a more feature rich version of text messaging. It’s great until the service isn’t available. What gives?

All these services are backed magically or not so magically by computer servers. These computers sit in datacenters, managed by operations teams, and to some degree with automation. All the things that brought down AWS & AirBNB & Reddit with it could also take out Apple. A serious storm like Sandy also presents real risks.

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iMessage is a text and SMS replacement service for iPhones & iPads. It is more feature rich, offering device synchronization, group texting & return receipt. But in a very big way it is also an attempt for Apple to muscle into the market and further extend it’s platform reach.
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100% uptime ain’t easy

Even for firms that promise insanely good uptime, five nines remains very very hard to achieve in practice.

For starters all the components behind your service, need to be redundant. Multiple load balancers, webservers, caching servers, and of course databases that hold all your business assets.

But as the repeated AWS outages attest, even redundancy here isn’t enough. You also need to use multiple cloud providers. Here you can mirror across clouds so even an outage in one won’t bring down your business.

What about in the world of messaging? Well you can bet your customers don’t likely know or care about high availability, uptime, or any of these other web operations buzzwords. But they sure understand when they can’t use their service. It may give companies like Apple pause as they try to stretch themselves into areas outside their core business of iphones, ipads, and the IOS platform itself.

iMessage – messaging standards power play

When I first upgraded to an iPhone 4S, the first thing I noticed was the light blue bubbles when texting certain people. Why was that, I wondered? I quickly found out about iMessage, which was conveniently configured, to replace my old and trusty text messaging.

Texts or SMS work across all phones, smartphone or not, and apple or not. But open standards don’t lend themselves well to market muscle and dominance. So it makes sense that Apple would be pushing into this space. I met more than one blackberry owner who loved using bbm to keep in touch with colleagues. It’s like your own private club. And that muscle further strengthens Apple’s platform overall. Just take a look at how the Android Ecosystem is broken if you need an example of what not to do.

The flip side is it means you have more to manage. More servers, more services, more dimensions to your business. More frequent outages that can tarnish your reputation.

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A lot complaining and publicity like the iMessage outage received, may just be an indication that you’re big enough for people to care.
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Alternatives abound…

There is huge competition in the messaging space. The outage and it’s publicity further underline this fact.

For example on the iPhone for messaging there is ChatOn, Whatsapp, LINE, SKYPE & wechat just to name a few.

Interestingly, while researching this article, I downloaded WhatsApp to give it a try. Only 99 cents, why not. Turns out that they had not one, but two outages, just a week ago. Seems Apple isn’t the only one experiencing growing pains.

A lot of complaining and publicity could be a sign that you’re big enough for people to care!

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