The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

Habits. We all have them. The good ones we celebrate, but the bad ones we struggle with. Duhigg’s book may introduce some ideas to those of us less familiar with behavioral sciences but it fails to effectively teach us how to form good habits and break the bad ones.

Filled with pages of stories from successful brands such as Pepsodent which Duhigg credits for turning the brushing of teeth into a daily routine; and perhaps more tenuous ones about leaders such as Paul O’ Neill, the CEO of Alcoa who purportedly turned around the fortunes of an ailing organisation by changing its safety practices.

From cue, routine to reward we must first identify the habit, then in a way that parallels the success of Alcoholic Anonymous, you replace the routine, keeping the cue and reward. In discussing the success of AA and others, he brings up the importance of belief in long term success of habit change. He references William James’ famous quote “Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create that fact”.

Still, I couldn’t help thinking that for the average business manager it lacked actionable advice of the kind you might find in a Jim Collins Good to Great or Chip Conley’s Peak. These books also have excellent story telling, but break things down in a very specific set of steps and attributes that an organization or individual can apply today.

Duhigg’s writing is easy to read and that’s probably the book’s greatest strength. Yet with most of it grounded more in interesting anecdotes than credible research, the examples unfortunately give for more entertaining reading than any deep insight.